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Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Assessor: Services
Homestead Law 

NRS 115 is the chapter in the Nevada Revised Statutes that concerns the homestead law.

We hope this brief summary of the Nevada Homestead Law will be of assistance to you.  If you need a homestead declaration form, you may download one from this Web page.

You will need your parcel number and legal description to complete your Homestead form.  If you do not have this information (it is on your recorded deed), you may get it from our online Real Property Records.

We are not permitted to assist in completing any legal document.

If you have any legal questions regarding this document, please consult your attorney.

PROCEDURES FOR RECORDING DECLARATION OF HOMESTEAD

  1. Complete the Homestead Declaration form.  The form must be printed legibly in black ink.  Text cannot extend beyond the one-inch margins on all sides of the form.  An additional $25.00 recording fee could be applied if the form does not meet these requirements at time of recording.
  2. Sign in the presence of a Notary Public
  3. Take the completed document to Clark County Recorder

 Main Office

 Northwest Office

500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. 2nd Floor 

 3211 N. Tenaya Way Suite #118

 Box 551510

 Las Vegas NV  89129

Las Vegas NV  89155-1510

 

   4. The recording fee is $17.00 for the first page and $1.00 per page for each additional  page. Acceptable forms of payment are: cash (in person only); money order; credit card (Visa, MasterCard, Discover, or American Express) or company check with contact information. Credit card orders are not accepted by phone or through the mail.

The completed Homestead Declaration can also be mailed to the Recorder's main office. The Recorder's Office is unable to accept mailed documents for recording at the Northwest Office.

WHAT THE LAW PROVIDES:

When you record a Declaration of Homestead, Nevada law protects the equity in your home up to $550,000 from general creditor claims (unpaid medical bills, bankruptcy, charge card debts, business/personal loans, accidents) but would not preclude a seizure or forced sale of your residence from general creditors if your equity exceeds the $550,000.  A creditor may file suit and can record a judgment lien against any real property you own.  Recording a Declaration of Homestead protects your principal residence up to the statutory maximum.  For example, if the value of your home is $645,000 and you have a first mortgage of $485,000 plus a second mortgage of $10,000, the equity is $150,000.

WHAT IS NOT PROTECTED:

The Homestead law does not protect you against debts secured by a mortgage or deed of trust, payment of taxes, IRS lien, mechanic's lien, child support or alimony payments.