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Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Family Support Division
Child Support Issues FAQ


  • How do I open a child support case?
  • What type of information is required to start a case for child support?
  • Is there a fee for opening a child support case?
  • What if the parents of the child(ren) were never married to each other?
  • What if I am on Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF)?
  • If I am on TANF, am I still eligible to receive child support payments from the noncustodial parent?
  • What if I am not on TANF?
  • Are my children eligible for medical insurance coverage?
  • Can the Court order the noncustodial parent to pay child support?
  • What if the noncustodial parent has a job, but is not making child support payments ordered by the Court?
  • What if the noncustodial parent, who owes child support, receives unemployment, workers' compensation, or state or local government retirement system benefits?
  • What if the noncustodial parent does not have a job or any other income or assets?
  • What if the noncustodial parent owns real property, but still does not pay the court ordered child support?
  • What other enforcement tools does the District Attorney's Office, Family Support Division use in attempting to collect child support for the custodial parent?
  • Does the District Attorney's Office, Family Support Division also determine custody of the children and visitation rights or settle visitation disputes?
  • Does the District Attorney's Office, Family Support Division resolve property settlement matters or collect payment of medical bills?
  • Will the District Attorney's Office, Family Support Division locate children or become involved in cases of rape or incest?
  • Will my case be kept confidential?



  • How do I open a child support case? [TOP]
    You can either telephone the Family Support Division at (702) 671-9200 and have an application mailed to you, stop by our office and pick an application up, or visit our Filing for Child Support page. Once you have completed the paperwork, you can mail it or drop it off in person.

    What type of information is required to start a case for child support? [TOP]
    The Family Support Division will need to have as much of the following information as possible in order to successfully collect child support for you:

    The full legal name and address of the person who is obligated to pay the child support.

    The date of birth and physical description of the noncustodial parent. Photographs are very helpful.

    The social security number of the noncustodial parent.

    The birth certificate for each child on the case.

    A decree of divorce or legal separation agreement between you and the noncustodial parent, if applicable.

    The name and address of the current or most recent employer of the noncustodial parent.

    The name and address of friends or relatives of the noncustodial parent.

    Any and all information relating to income and other assets of the noncustodial parent.

    REMEMBER, the more information you provide us with, the easier it will be to collect child support for you.

    Is there a fee for opening a child support case? [TOP]
    No. Effective January 1, 2000 there is no longer a fee to open a child support case.

    What if the parents of the child(ren) were never married to each other? [TOP]
    Then an action to establish paternity must be initiated. See Paternity Issues FAQ.

    What if I am on Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF)? [TOP]
    Your case will automatically be referred to the District Attorney's Office, Family Support Division.

    If I am on TANF, am I still eligible to receive child support payments from the noncustodial parent? [TOP]
    If you are receiving TANF , your rights to receive court ordered child support may be affected.

    What if I am not on TANF? [TOP]
    Child support collected on behalf of non-TANF families goes directly to the custodial parent.

    Are my children eligible for medical insurance coverage? [TOP]
    We can establish and enforce medical insurance coverage.

    Can the Court order the noncustodial parent to pay child support? [TOP]
    Yes. The District Attorney's Office, Family Support Division, can get a court order for child support. However, to get a court order, we must know where the noncustodial parent resides or works.

    What if the noncustodial parent has a job, but is not making child support payments ordered by the Court? [TOP]
    We can get an order for income withholding and the child support will be withheld from the noncustodial parent's wages or salary. The court order for withholding of the noncustodial parent's wages, other income, or assets for payment of child support applies to all future employers and all future sources of income. However, in order to establish income withholding, we must know where the noncustodial parent works.

    What if the noncustodial parent, who owes child support, receives unemployment, workers' compensation, or state or local government retirement system benefits? [TOP]
    Those benefit checks can be attached for payment of support.

    What if the noncustodial parent does not have a job or any other income or assets? [TOP]
    The Court will order him or her to find a job and to notify the Court immediately when a job has been found. We can also intercept federal and state income tax refunds from the parent who owes child support.

    What if the noncustodial parent owns real property, but still does not pay the court ordered child support? [TOP]
    We can impose liens against real property belonging to the noncustodial parent for the amount of child support which is overdue.

    What other enforcement tools does the District Attorney's Office, Family Support Division use in attempting to collect child support for the custodial parent? [TOP]
    In addition to income withholding, which includes withholding of unemployment and worker's compensation benefits and military and government checks, we can suspend driver's licenses and professional, occupational, and recreational licenses, certificates, and permits.

    Does the District Attorney's Office, Family Support Division also determine custody of the children and visitation rights or settle visitation disputes? [TOP]
    No. You will need to seek the advice of an attorney regarding those issues.

    Does the District Attorney's Office, Family Support Division resolve property settlement matters or collect payment of medical bills? [TOP]
    No. You will need to seek the advice of an attorney regarding those issues.

    Will the District Attorney's Office, Family Support Division locate children or become involved in cases of rape or incest? [TOP]
    If the problems in the above question exist, you should report them to the appropriate police agency for their assistance and for the assistance of the Criminal Division of the District Attorney's Office or seek the advice of a private attorney.

    Will my case be kept confidential? [TOP]
    Any information that you give us may be reported to Nevada State Welfare and there is no lawyer-client privilege. Also, we must put in our pleadings your and your child's name, and serve them on the person you are seeking child support from. All documents filed with the County Clerk's Office are available to the public. You can provide an affidavit giving sufficient information to show the court that you or your child's health, safety or liberty are at risk if this information is provided. The Court may order your file sealed in the County Clerk's Office. The files of the District Attorney's Family Support Division are otherwise held in confidence.

    PLEASE FEEL FREE TO CONTACT THIS OFFICE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.