Park Classification

Park Classification

Within urban unincorporated Clark County parks are classified into Neighborhood, Community, Regional, and Special Use parks. All parks within urban Clark County are classified into one of these categories. Clark County has adopted a goal to reach an optimum mix of park types or classes by 2035. The optimum mix is based on the special needs of the community (see Park Composition). Following is a description of each park class.

Neighborhood Park – smaller day use facility, optimally 10 acres in size, which serves family and small group activities such as picnics, exercise, and general play. This type of park should be found within one mile of all residents.

Community Park – medium sized facility, optimally 30 acres in size, which may house a small day/night sports complex, small recreation center, outdoor play pool, and host small to medium community events. This type of facility also meets the neighborhood park need and should be located within 2.5 miles of every resident.

Regional Park – large day/evening facility, optimally 250 acres in size, with a large recreation center (over 20,000 ft2), large day/night sports complex (more than 4 fields), aquatic complex with indoor and outdoor pools, and can host large regional events for more than 1,000 people. Amenities found in a regional park will also meet the neighborhood park and community park needs of those living within one mile and 2.5 miles respectively. Regional parks should be located within 5 miles of every resident. 

Special Use Facility – while the other park types often house special use amenities, a park dedicated to one purpose is known as a special use facility. This includes the County’s equestrian park, shooting park, wetlands park, museums, outdoor camps, etc.

Rural Unincorporated Clark County - within rural unincorporated Clark County, parks are classified simply as Rural Parks and Special Use Parks. This classification provides the flexibility needed by rural communities. For instance, smaller Rural Parks must meet the neighborhood, community, and regional needs that are found in different sized parks within the urban Las Vegas Valley. Additionally, within rural Clark County a special interest rarely reaches the number of participants to warrant a park dedicated to that special need. However, this does occasionally happen as is the case with the Clark County Fair Grounds in Moapa Valley.