Park Planning Program

Park Planning Program

The Parks Planning Program facilitates the planning, design and development of park amenities for residents and visitors, in both urban and rural areas of Clark County. County parks provide a wide variety of both active and passive recreational opportunities. Providing parks and recreation services is one of the most basic functions of local government. The goal of the Park Planning Program is to plan and build safe, attractive and functional parks and recreation facilities which will improve the quality of life for Clark County residents. It is well documented that recreational facilities help to promote public health and facilitate an important sense of community (see Quality of Life Benefits of Parks).

The County’s first park, Camp Lee Canyon was opened in 1961, and soon thereafter the Clark County Department of Parks and Recreation was established in  1963. Then in 1964 the first urban parks, Paradise and Parkdale, were opened. Then in 1967 an old ranch became the origins of Sunset Park, the first regional park, and the rural community of Moapa Valley dedicated their first park, Grant Bowler. Today, in 2010, the County has over 100 parks to serve the community. National statistics show that the average American spends approximately five hours per day on leisure activities. Both public and private recreational services help fill this available leisure time. This means residents and visitors may choose any of the recreational opportunities provided by local, state or federal governments, as well as the private sector.

ParkLaborStats2006

While Clark County and other local jurisdictions continue to build urban park and recreation facilities, the private sector also provides marketable recreation and leisure services. These services, those with sufficient market demand, are more efficiently provided by the private sector. Federal and state agencies also provide recreation opportunities outside the urban area, primarily connecting people with the great outdoors. This leaves local governments with the  responsibility to meet a very specific public recreation need. To meet this need Clark County plans and builds specific types of parks (see Park Classifications).