Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is Assembly Bill 349?
A: Assembly Bill 349 is an amendment to Nevada state law, passed in the 2021 Nevada Legislative Session, that changes the criteria required by the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles to register your vehicle with the classic vehicle specialty plates – Old Timer, Classic Vehicle, and Classic Rod – which exempts a qualified vehicle from emissions testing.

Q: What does Assembly Bill 349 change?
A: Assembly Bill 349 changes the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles requirements for registering a vehicle as a “Classic Vehicle,” “Classic Rod,” or “Old Timer”. In addition, the Bill allows for a new vehicle to wait until its 4th registration before needing an emissions test, one year later than was previously allowed.

Q: When are the requirements changing?
A: Assembly Bill 349 goes into effect January 1, 2023.

Q: How are the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles requirements changing?
A: The biggest change to Nevada Department of Motor Vehicle requirements is that classic or antique vehicle insurance is now required to qualify for Old Timer, Classic Vehicle, and Classic Rod specialty license plates.  The requirement that vehicles with these plates may not be used in any commercial capacity and may not be driven more than 5,000 miles per year remains in place.  For more information, visit DMV’s website: https://dmv.nv.gov/emission.htm

Q: Why was the law changed?
A: The changes adopted under Assembly Bill 349 were made to address a loophole in the existing law that was being exploited to register vehicles in Nevada that could not pass an emissions test. Vehicles with an Old Timer, Classic Vehicle, and Classic Rod specialty license plate should only be driven a limited number of miles annually to car shows and conventions, kept as investments and collectibles, or used as hobby vehicles due to unique models or limited release.  These vehicles cannot be used for commercial purposes or as everyday commute vehicles.  By requiring classic or antique vehicle insurance to qualify for these specialty plates, the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles can now ensure the vehicles receiving these plates meet the proper requirements.

In addition, heightened concerns with air pollution influenced the need for these changes.  The increase of registered vehicles without emissions testing negatively impacts air quality in Clark County.   These changes will help decrease the number of high polluting vehicles in low-income and historically underserved communities that may be disproportionately impacted by poor air quality.

Q: How do I get classic vehicle insurance and how much will it cost?
A: Classic vehicle insurance policies have specific requirements that vary from company to company – there is typically a vehicle age/model year requirement and an annual cap on mileage driven.  Typically, a classic vehicle policy premium is lower than comprehensive coverage because there is an agreed up or appraised value of your classic vehicle and annual mileage is limited.  However, it depends on the company and coverage you choose.  Call your insurance agent or an insurance company to find out specific details for your vehicle.   

Q: Do the changes to the law only apply to Clark County residents?
A: No, changes to the law are applicable statewide. 

Q: Why is the Department of Environment and Sustainability involved?
A: The Department of Environment and Sustainability (DES) is the regional air pollution control agency for Clark County, Nevada.  Through its Division of Air Quality, DES’s mission is to protect the air we share and ensure compliance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards.  Getting older, polluting vehicles to a point they can pass emissions testing is important to maintaining good air quality for all citizens in the County, especially low-income and historically underserved communities that may be disproportionately impacted by poor quality.  DES is providing funding for a one-year pilot program to assist eligible, low-income vehicle owners in repairing their vehicles after a failed emissions test. 

Q: What happens if I can’t or don’t renew my vehicle registration?
A: Driving a vehicle without a valid registration may result in a citation of $1000.  Additional penalties are at the discretion of law enforcement.