Announcements

Advisories and Alerts

Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020: Smoke Advisory Extended Through Monday Due to Wildfire Smoke
AQ Twitter_advise-smoke_REVIZEThe Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability (DES) is extending its current smoke advisory through Monday, Sept. 28 due to regional wildfire smoke persisting in the southwestern U.S., including southern Nevada. The smoke affects visibility and higher particulate levels at the surface.

Smoke is made of small dust particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Smoke and other pollutants can aggravate respiratory diseases such as bronchitis and asthma or heart disease. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. Under today’s conditions, it may be best for children, the elderly and people with respiratory and heart disease to stay indoors.

HELPFUL TIPS TO LIMIT PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO SMOKE
  • Limit outdoor exertion on days with high levels of fine particles in the air. Exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale. 
  • Keep windows and doors closed. 
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow’s website.
About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.
Monday, Sept. 21, 2020: Smoke Advisory Extended Through Thursday Due to Wildfire Smoke
AQ Twitter_advise-smoke_REVIZEThe Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability (DES) is extending its current smoke advisory through Thursday, Sept. 24 due to regional wildfire smoke persisting in the southwestern U.S., including southern Nevada. The smoke affects visibility and higher particulate levels at the surface.

Smoke is made of small dust particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Smoke and other pollutants can aggravate respiratory diseases such as bronchitis and asthma or heart disease. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. Under today’s conditions, it may be best for children, the elderly and people with respiratory and heart disease to stay indoors.

HELPFUL TIPS TO LIMIT PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO SMOKE
  • Limit outdoor exertion on days with high levels of fine particles in the air. Exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale. 
  • Keep windows and doors closed. 
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow’s website.
About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.
Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020: Smoke Advisory Extended Through Monday Due to Wildfire Smoke
Air-Quality-Advisory_Smoke_300x150The Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability (DES) is extending its current smoke advisory through Monday, Sept. 21 due to regional wildfire smoke persisting in the southwestern U.S., including southern Nevada. The smoke affects visibility and higher particulate levels at the surface.

Smoke is made of small dust particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Smoke and other pollutants can aggravate respiratory diseases such as bronchitis and asthma or heart disease. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. Under today’s conditions, it may be best for children, the elderly and people with respiratory and heart disease to stay indoors.

HELPFUL TIPS TO LIMIT PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO SMOKE
  • Limit outdoor exertion on days with high levels of fine particles in the air. Exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale. 
  • Keep windows and doors closed. 
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow’s website.
About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

News Releases

Mon., Sept. 14, 2020:  Smoke Advisory Extended for Monday - Thursday Due to Wildfire Smoke
AirQuality-AdvSmokeThe Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability (DES) is extending a smoke advisory for Monday, Sept. 14 through Thursday, Sept. 17 due to regional wildfire smoke persisting in the southwestern U.S., including southern Nevada. The smoke affects visibility and higher particulate levels at the surface. 

Smoke is made of small dust particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Smoke and other pollutants can aggravate respiratory diseases such as bronchitis and asthma or heart disease. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. Under today’s conditions, it may be best for children, the elderly and people with respiratory and heart disease to stay indoors.

HELPFUL TIPS TO LIMIT PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO SMOKE
  • Limit outdoor exertion on days with high levels of fine particles in the air. Exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale. 
  • Keep windows and doors closed. 
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow’s website.
About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.
Friday, Sept. 11, 2020: Smoke Advisory Issued for Friday - Sunday Due to Wildfire Smoke
AirQuality-AdvSmokeThe Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability (DES) is issuing an advisory for Friday, Sept. 11 to Sunday, Sept. 13 for elevated levels of smoke due to regional wildfire smoke expanding into the southwest U.S., including southern Nevada. DES Division of Air Quality officials say smoke will be aloft with lingering smoke in the Las Vegas valley. 

Smoke is made of small dust particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Smoke and other pollutants can aggravate respiratory diseases such as bronchitis and asthma or heart disease. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. Under today’s conditions, it may be best for children, the elderly and people with respiratory and heart disease to stay indoors.

HELPFUL TIPS TO LIMIT PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO SMOKE
  • Limit outdoor exertion on days with high levels of fine particles in the air. Exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale. 
  • Keep windows and doors closed. 
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow’s website.
About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.
###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.
Sept, 8, 2020: Smoke, Dust Advisory Issued for Tuesday Due to Wildfires and High Winds
Air-Quality-Cloud_Smoke-Dust_OUTLINESThe Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability (DES) is issuing an advisory for Tuesday, Sept. 8 for continuing high levels of smoke from California wildfires, and to advise residents and local construction sites of elevated levels of blowing dust due to high winds occurring in our area. DES Division of Air Quality officials say smoke is made of small dust particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases. Airborne dust is a form of inhalable air pollution called particulate matter or PM, which aggravates respiratory diseases.

Smoke is made of small particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Exposure to ozone can induce coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath even in healthy people. A seasonal ozone advisory is currently in effect.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, people who may be most sensitive to elevated levels of particulate matter includes individuals with respiratory problems, cardiac disease, young children or senior citizens. Under windy conditions people with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children may feel better staying indoors as much as possible because they could be at greater risk from particulates, especially when they are physically active, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. 

TIPS TO LIMIT EXPOSURE TO SMOKE AND DUST INCLUDE:
  • Stay indoors when you smell or see smoke.
  • Limit outdoor exertion on windy days when dust is in the air. Exercise, for example, makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed. 
  • Run your air conditioner inside your house and car to filter out particulates. 
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • To keep dust down, drive slowly on unpaved roads.
  • Don’t take short cuts across vacant lots.
  • Ride off-road vehicles in approved areas outside the urban Las Vegas Valley.
  • Call Air Quality’s dust complaint hotline at 702-385-DUST (3878) to report excessive amounts of blowing dust from construction sites, vacant lots or facilities.
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow’s website.
About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.
###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.
Sept. 7, 2020: Smoke, Ozone Advisory Issued for Monday Due to Wildfire Smoke
AirQuality-Final_AdvS-OThe Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability (DES) is issuing an advisory for Monday, Sep. 7 for elevated levels of smoke and ozone due to the California wildfires sending smoke into central and southern Nevada. DES Division of Air Quality officials say smoke is made of small dust particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. 

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, people who may be most sensitive to elevated levels of particulates and ozone include individuals with respiratory problems, cardiac disease, young children or senior citizens. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. 

Smoke is made of small particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Exposure to ozone can induce coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath even in healthy people. A seasonal ozone advisory is currently in effect.

SMOKE AND OZONE TIPS
  • Stay indoors when you smell or see smoke.
  • Limit outdoor activity and exertion when ozone levels are elevated – exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you may inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed. Run your air conditioner inside your house and car. Air conditioning filters out smoke and particles.
  • Change your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example. 
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip. 
  • Don’t idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don’t top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained. 
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air. 
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow’s website.
The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow’s website.

About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.
Aug. 20, 2020: Smoke, Ozone Advisory Extended Through Friday Due to Wildfire Smoke
AirQuality-Final_AdvS-OThe Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability (DES) is extending its advisory to include Thursday, Aug. 20 – Friday, Aug. 21 for elevated levels of smoke and ozone due to the regional wildfires throughout the southwest U.S. DES Division of Air Quality officials say smoke is made of small dust particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation.
According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, people who may be most sensitive to elevated levels of particulates and ozone include individuals with respiratory problems, cardiac disease, young children or senior citizens. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. 

Smoke is made of small particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Exposure to ozone can induce coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath even in healthy people. A seasonal ozone advisory is currently in effect.

SMOKE AND OZONE TIPS
  • Stay indoors when you smell or see smoke.
  • Limit outdoor activity and exertion when ozone levels are elevated – exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you may inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed. Run your air conditioner inside your house and car. Air conditioning filters out smoke and particles.
  • Change your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example. 
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip. 
  • Don’t idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don’t top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained. 
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air. 
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow’s website.


About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.
04-20-2020 - Clark County Air Quality is Good, Despite American Lung Association Grade

Clark County Air Quality is Good, Despite American Lung Association Grade

Clark County's air quality continues to improve—including a 12 percent reduction in ozone since 2007, despite receiving questionable grades in the American Lung Association's annual State of the Air report. The report—which analyzes air quality data from 2016 - 2018—gave Clark County a failing grade for ozone, which is rated 'good' or 'moderate' 93.5 percent of the time, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's health-based standards. For Clark County's air quality division at its Department of Environment and Sustainability, the numbers do not add up.

"If we're applying the American Lung Association's arbitrary and subjective grading scale, anything below 99.2 percent is considered failing," said Department of Environment and Sustainability Director Marci Henson. "That doesn't make sense to us."

Ozone is a colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's upper atmosphere. At ground level, ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. According to the EPA, exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people.

Henson argues the EPA's standards provide a fair, objective and health-based reading of air quality data through its National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). According to the EPA, Clark County's air quality is in attainment for five of the six criteria pollutants it is required to monitor: carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, lead, particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) and sulfur dioxide. The County is in marginal nonattainment for ozone, the EPA's lowest level of nonattainment.

"Though our air quality is good and continues to improve, ozone continues to be our No. 1 challenge during the summer months," said Henson. "However, with the exception of wildfire years in 2017 and 2018, ozone has been on the decline for the past several years."

Despite the rebuke of the grade, Henson believes the Dept. of Environment and Sustainability and the American Lung Association are allies fighting for the same cause: protecting the air we share.

 "We have a great relationship with our local chapter of the American Lung Association," said Henson. "Both our organizations strive to achieve the same goals. Despite our disagreement with their report, we will continue to build on our partnership at the local level to educate and inform our community about how we protect the air we share and also how individuals can protect it, too."

The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability invites residents to adopt a few simple practices to help lower ground-level ozone pollution:

  • Keep your car well maintained, including proper air pressure in tires.
  • Map out errands and trips to ensure the most efficient routes.
  • Take public transportation.
  • Fill your gas tank after sunset.
  • Use electric landscaping equipment instead of gas-powered.

Ozone Chart.png

About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through the work of these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

Aug. 13, 2020 - Smoke, Ozone Advisory Issued for Thursday  Due to Wildfire Smoke

AirQuality-Final_AdvS-OThe Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability (DES) is issuing an advisory for Thursday, Aug. 13 for elevated levels of smoke and ozone due to the Lake Fire north of Los Angeles and other regional wildfires. DES Division of Air Quality officials say smoke is made of small dust particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. 

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, people who may be most sensitive to elevated levels of particulates and ozone include individuals with respiratory problems, cardiac disease, young children or senior citizens. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. 

Smoke is made of small particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Exposure to ozone can induce coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath even in healthy people. A seasonal ozone advisory is currently in effect.

SMOKE AND OZONE TIPS
  • Stay indoors when you smell or see smoke.
  • Limit outdoor activity and exertion when ozone levels are elevated – exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you may inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed. Run your air conditioner inside your house and car. Air conditioning filters out smoke and particles.
  • Change your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example. 
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip. 
  • Don’t idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don’t top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained. 
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air. 
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow’s website.
About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.
Aug. 18, 2020: Smoke, Ozone Advisory Issued for Tuesday and Wednesday Due to Wildfire Smoke
AirQuality-Final_AdvS-OThe Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability (DES) is issuing an advisory for Tues., Aug. 18 – Wed., Aug. 19 for elevated levels of smoke and ozone due to the regional wildfires in the southwest U.S. DES Division of Air Quality officials say smoke is made of small dust particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. 

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, people who may be most sensitive to elevated levels of particulates and ozone include individuals with respiratory problems, cardiac disease, young children or senior citizens. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. 

Smoke is made of small particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Exposure to ozone can induce coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath even in healthy people. A seasonal ozone advisory is currently in effect.

SMOKE AND OZONE TIPS
  • Stay indoors when you smell or see smoke.
  • Limit outdoor activity and exertion when ozone levels are elevated – exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you may inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed. Run your air conditioner inside your house and car. Air conditioning filters out smoke and particles.
  • Change your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example. 
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip. 
  • Don’t idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don’t top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained. 
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air. 
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow’s website.


About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.
Aug. 20, 2020: Smoke, Ozone Advisory Extended Through Friday Due to Wildfire Smoke
AirQuality-Final_AdvS-OThe Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability (DES) is extending its advisory for Thursday, Aug. 20 – Friday, Aug. 21 for elevated levels of smoke and ozone due to the regional wildfires throughout the southwest U.S. DES Division of Air Quality officials say smoke is made of small dust particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, people who may be most sensitive to elevated levels of particulates and ozone include individuals with respiratory problems, cardiac disease, young children or senior citizens. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. 

Smoke is made of small particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Exposure to ozone can induce coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath even in healthy people. A seasonal ozone advisory is currently in effect.

SMOKE AND OZONE TIPS
  • Stay indoors when you smell or see smoke.
  • Limit outdoor activity and exertion when ozone levels are elevated – exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you may inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed. Run your air conditioner inside your house and car. Air conditioning filters out smoke and particles.
  • Change your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example. 
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip. 
  • Don’t idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don’t top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained. 
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air. 
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow’s website.


About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.
Aug. 21, 2020: Smoke, Ozone Advisory Extended Through Weekend Due to Wildfire Smoke
AirQuality-Final_AdvS-OThe Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability (DES) is extending its current advisory to include Saturday, Aug. 22 and Sunday, Aug. 23 for elevated levels of smoke and ozone due to the regional wildfires throughout the southwest U.S. DES Division of Air Quality officials say smoke is made of small dust particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. 

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, people who may be most sensitive to elevated levels of particulates and ozone include individuals with respiratory problems, cardiac disease, young children or senior citizens. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. 

Smoke is made of small particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Exposure to ozone can induce coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath even in healthy people. A seasonal ozone advisory is currently in effect.

SMOKE AND OZONE TIPS
  • Stay indoors when you smell or see smoke.
  • Limit outdoor activity and exertion when ozone levels are elevated – exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you may inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed. Run your air conditioner inside your house and car. Air conditioning filters out smoke and particles.
  • Change your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example. 
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip. 
  • Don’t idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don’t top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained. 
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air. 
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow’s website.

About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.
Sept. 3: Smoke, Ozone Advisory Issued for Thursday and Friday Due to Wildfire Smoke
AirQuality-Final_AdvS-OThe Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability (DES) is issuing an advisory for Thursday, Sep. 3 to Friday, Sep. 4 for elevated levels of smoke and ozone due to the regional wildfires in the southwest U.S. DES Division of Air Quality officials say smoke is made of small dust particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. 

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, people who may be most sensitive to elevated levels of particulates and ozone include individuals with respiratory problems, cardiac disease, young children or senior citizens. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. 

Smoke is made of small particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Exposure to ozone can induce coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath even in healthy people. A seasonal ozone advisory is currently in effect.

SMOKE AND OZONE TIPS
  • Stay indoors when you smell or see smoke.
  • Limit outdoor activity and exertion when ozone levels are elevated – exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you may inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed. Run your air conditioner inside your house and car. Air conditioning filters out smoke and particles.
  • Change your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example. 
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip. 
  • Don’t idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don’t top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained. 
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air. 
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow’s website.
About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.
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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.
4/6/2020 - Monitoring Network Plan
Contact: Yousaf Hameed
Phone: 702-455-1664
Email: hameed@clarkcountynv.gov

NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR COMMENTS ON CLARK COUNTY’S

AMBIENT AIR MONITORING NETWORK 

In accordance with 40 CFR §58.10(a)(1), Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability will make its Draft Annual Monitoring Network Plan for 2020 ("Draft Plan") available for public inspection and comment from April 9, 2020 through May 9, 2020.  The Draft Plan details the operation and location of existing ambient air monitors operated by the Department of Environment and Sustainability and its planned modifications to the air monitoring network.  The final Annual Monitoring Network Plan for 2020 to be submitted to the United States Environmental Protection Agency will include and address, as appropriate, all comments received by the May 9, 2020 deadline.

Comments on and requests for a copy of the Draft Plan should be directed to:  Yousaf Hameed, Air Quality Monitoring Supervisor, 4701 West Russell Road, Suite 200, Las Vegas, Nevada 89118; telephone (702) 455-1664; email 
hameed@clarkcountynv.gov.

See Draft Plan and Appendices below:
2020 Monitoring Network Plan
Appendix A
Appendix B
4/6/2020 - Is COVID-19 Impacting Air Quality?

Less Vehicle Traffic During COVID-19 Public Health Crisis Yielding Less Air Pollution, Data Suggests

As the nation and world grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic, Clark County vehicle traffic has been reduced. With the resort corridor shut down and many locals complying with Gov. Steve Sisolak's stay-at-home order, Las Vegas Valley roadway traffic is noticeably less crowded. Is that reduction in vehicle emissions having an impact on air quality? Recent data gathered by the County's Department of Environment and Sustainability indicate less overall pollutant emissions in the region, with much of it likely due to fewer vehicles on the roads.

"We are seeing reductions in PM2.5—small particulate matter—and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) when you compare data from the first half of March to the second half," said Environment and Sustainability meteorologist Paul Fransioli. "Data shows about a one-third decrease in those pollutants from February to March."

The conclusion stems from analysis of data from two air quality monitoring stations—one located at Jerome Mack Middle School on East Karen Avenue and a near-roadside station monitoring vehicle emissions at Rancho Drive and Teddy Drive. Levels for NO2 and PM2.5 decreased from March 1-16 compared to March 17-23. Both pollutants are considered harmful to health and the environment by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

According to the EPA, air pollution emitted from the transportation sector (cars, trucks, commercial aircraft and railroads) contributes to smog and poor air quality. Pollutants that contribute to poor air quality include particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOX).

Other findings include:

  • Based on five years of air quality index data (2016 – 20), particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide and ozone are down slightly in March 2020 as compared to March in the years 2016 – 19.
  • There were 16 days in February with MODERATE overall air quality, according to the Air Quality Index (AQI), compared to one MODERATE day in March.

Though more study is required to determine how much impact the reduced vehicle traffic is having on the pollutants in the air, DES officials believe these results are consistent with similar air quality findings around the country. And, Fransioli points out, weather patterns were consistent throughout the period. What does this mean for the region's overall air quality?

 "It's too early to tell how much impact this will have on ozone this summer. We know for a fact that Clark County's air quality has been good and improving since before the stay-at-home order," Fransioli said. "With the exception of wildfire summers, our air quality has steadily improved over the past 15 years or so."

Particulate Matter and Nitrogen Dioxide
Particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide are classified as criteria pollutants by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors the region's air quality and enforces all federal, health-based standards as mandated by the EPA and the Clean Air Act. Particulate matter is dust, smoke, soot and other particles in the air and is monitored and regulated in two sizes: PM10 (larger) and PM2.5 (smaller). NO2—nitrogen dioxide—is produced by the burning of fuel and contributes to the creation of particulate matter in the air as well as ground-level ozone, which is a toxic gas.

About the Department of Environment and Sustainability
The Department of Environment and Sustainability is the air pollution control agency, regional Endangered Species Act compliance program, and sustainability office for all of Clark County, Nevada. Established as the Department of Air Quality by the Clark County Commission in 2001, it was renamed in 2020 and is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Desert Conservation Program and Office of Sustainability. Through the work of these three divisions, DES is ensuring the air we share meets healthful, regulatory standards, administering the County's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and addressing climate change.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

4/3/2020 - Somerset Academy | Sky Pointe Fourth Grader to be Recognized as Mojave Max Emergence Contest Winner
Somerset Academy | Sky Pointe Fourth Grader Recognized as Mojave Max Emergence Contest Winner

Fourth-grade student Lillian Schern of Somerset Academy | Sky Pointe was named today as the winner of the 2020 Mojave Max Emergence Contest by the Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability's Desert Conservation Program. Lillian was surprised by the news from her teacher, Ms. Erin Bybee. She will be officially recognized as the winner on Thursday, April 21 at 10 a.m.

This event congratulates the student who most closely estimated when Mojave Max would emerge from his burrow this year.

More than 5,500 students entered the 21st Mojave Max Emergence Contest, which ended on Wednesday, April 1 at 11:39 a.m. with Mojave Max's emergence. Lillian guessed that Max would emerge on April 1 at 11:32 a.m.

"This is the 21st year that we've had this contest, and a whole generation of Southern Nevadans has grown up on Mojave Max," said Department of Environment and Sustainability Director Marci Henson. "I want to congratulate Lillian. This contest gives all participants a greater appreciation for protecting our desert environment."

Given the unusual set of circumstances presented by the COVID-19 emergency situation, the winner's entire class will be receiving a "virtual" field trip. Staff from the Springs Preserve will give a virtual tour where Lillian and her classmates will get to 'meet' Mojave Max during the event. Local news personality and good friend to Mojave Max Nathan Tannenbaum will be online to emcee the event and the winner will receive her prizes, including: a year-long family membership to the Springs Preserve, a year-long "America the Beautiful" pass from the National Park Service to all national parks and federal recreation areas, a backpack filled with outdoor goodies and a laptop computer. The winner's teacher will also receive a laptop computer.

The Mojave Max Education Program is sponsored by a partnership between Clark County, Springs Preserve, Get Outdoors Nevada and the Clark County School District.

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

4/2/2020 - Small Business Assistance Available Throughout COVID-19 Crisis

Contact: Kevin J MacDonald
Phone: 702-232-0931
Email: kevmac@ClarkCountyNV.gov

Small Business Assistance Available Throughout COVID-19 Crisis

SBAP Logo BLUE_Outlines

Though the Department of Environment and Sustainability's offices remain closed to the public in keeping with Gov. Sisolak's stay-at-home order, the Small Business Assistance Program is operating remotely and available for assistance throughout the COVID-19 emergency situation.

When you have questions about your air quality forms, please call 702-239-1109 or 702-306-2299 during our normal operating hours, Mon. - Fri. 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. Click here for more information about the Small Business Assistance Program.

4/1/2020 - Mojave Max Has Emerged!
  • Contact: Heather Green
  • Phone: 702-203-8060
  • Email: hyg@ClarkCountyNV.gov
  • Mojave Max Has Emerged!
  • Local Desert Tortoise's Emergence Marks Beginning of Spring
Mojave Max

Mojave Max, the famous Southern Nevada desert tortoise, officially emerged from his burrow today at 11:39 a.m. The earliest he has emerged was Feb. 14, 2005, at 11:55 a.m. The latest he has emerged is April 17, 2012, at 12:41 p.m.

Mojave Max is a live desert tortoise who calls the Las Vegas Springs Preserve his home. Like other Southern Nevada reptiles, he enters a burrow to brumate (the reptilian form of hibernation) every winter and emerges every spring. Mojave Max's emergence marks the beginning of spring-like weather in Southern Nevada. Warmer temperatures, longer daylight hours and his own internal clock are factors known to contribute to his emergence every year.

As part of the 21st annual Mojave Max Emergence Contest, Elementary School students from Clark County, Nevada have been studying Mojave Desert weather, temperatures and conditions to scientifically estimate when they believed Mojave Max would emerge from his burrow in 2020. They entered their guesses online at www.mojavemax.com. The entries are being tabulated and the official winner of the Mojave Max Emergence Contest will be announced soon. The winning student will receive prizes including a year-long family membership to the Springs Preserve, an "America the Beautiful" year-long family pass to National Parks and Federal Recreation areas, and a laptop computer. The winner's entire class will receive Olympic-style medals and T-shirts as well as a trophy for his or her school, and a field trip, with a pizza party, to the Springs Preserve to meet the live Mojave Max tortoise, while the winner's teacher will receive a laptop computer.

"Each year, Mojave Max's emergence signals the unofficial beginning of spring in Clark County," said Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability Director Marci Henson. "And though it is a unique set of circumstances Max is waking up to, it is still a perfect opportunity for thousands of Clark County school children to continue to learn how to respect, protect and enjoy our delicate desert ecosystem, thanks to Mojave Max."

The Emergence Contest has taken place every year since 2000. More than 5,500 emergence contest guesses were received during this year's Emergence Contest.

Questions about the live Mojave Max tortoise should be directed to Tom Bradley with the Las Vegas Springs Preserve at (702) 822-8365. More information is available at www.ClarkCountyNV.gov or www.MojaveMax.com.                    

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

3/31/2020 - Seasonal Ozone Advisory Issued Through September
Seasonal Ozone Advisory Issued Through September

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

The Clark County Department of Environment and Sustainability issued a season-long advisory for ground-level ozone pollution today that will be in effect from Wednesday, April 1 – Wednesday, Sept. 30.

Ozone is a colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's upper atmosphere. At ground level, ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the EPA.

"Even though we're continuing to Stay Home for Nevada as we and the rest of the country work through the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to remind the community that ozone increases during the warmer months," said Department of Environment and Sustainability Director Marci Henson. "Our Air Quality Division continues to be an essential service to Clark County by enforcing federal, health-based standards. We also remind people they play an important role in helping reduce ground-level ozone."

HELPFUL TIPS TO REDUCE OZONE
Because cars, trucks and other vehicles are major contributors to ozone, people can follow these helpful, everyday tips to reduce ozone:

  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

 Also, if you have respiratory issues or other health concerns, consider these tips during ozone season:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walking instead of jogging, for example.
  • Always consult your doctor first for medical advice.

 
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Environment and Sustainability monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SustainClarkCounty and Twitter: @SustainClarkCty.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 11th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

1/21/2020 - County Commission Approves Dept. Name Change
DES Logo Circle_OUTLINESCounty Commission Approves Department Name Change

At its regular meeting today, the Clark County Commission approved by unanimous vote the Department of Air Quality will change its name to the Department of Environment and Sustainability. The move comes four months after the Commission moved the County's Office of Sustainability to Air Quality. The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability is comprised of three divisions: Air Quality, Sustainability and the Desert Conservation Program.

"The Dept. of Environment and Sustainability reflects the full breadth of the work our department performs for Clark County, and to administer the County's climate change action plan," said Environment and Sustainability Director Marci Henson. "In addition to implementing the County's climate change action plan, we will continue to monitor and protect the air we share as we have in the past as well as monitor and protect our region's wildlife and plant life."

Last October, Clark County joined the County Climate Coalition last October—which will be directed by the Office of Sustainability—with a goal of reducing local greenhouse gas emissions. The County Climate Coalition was started in June 2017 by the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors to encourage other counties to commit to uphold the Paris Agreement. The County also joined The Climate Reality Project, an organization founded by former Vice President Al Gore, to engage other counties to make the same commitment to the Paris Agreement's carbon emissions reduction goals.

Under the direction of Desert Conservation Program, the Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan is responsible for more than 600 conservation projects totaling more than $154 million, including:

  • Establishment of the Wild Desert Tortoise Assistance Line. When a tortoise is found on a construction site, they call 702-593-9027 and we will safely remove and translocate it to a new habitat in the wild. Due to this program, more than 700 wild desert tortoises have been safely collected from construction sites and relocated back into the wild.
  • Increased law enforcement presence, education and outreach about the Boulder City Conservation Easement, which allows for better management and maintenance of the area.
  • Preservation and restoration of desert riparian habitat within the Muddy and Virgin River watersheds, which allows several bird species to enjoy flourishing habitats.

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 13th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

1/16/2020 - Notice of Fee Adjustment (2020)

Notice of Fee Adjustment (2020)

This notice is being provided for interested parties in an effort to ensure all stationary sources that maintain a valid Air Quality Operating Permit, and all current holders of a Dust Control Permit issued by Clark County Department of Air Quality receive advance notice of the upcoming updates to the fee schedules.

Each year, the Section 18 fees are adjusted to reflect the change in the Urban Consumer Price Index for the previous year (2019).

Payments received in envelopes postmarked on 1/29/2020 will be assessed the new fees, unless the associated invoice(s) was generated prior to 1/29/2020. Thank you for your attention in this matter.


The current fee schedules are available on the Air Quality website at: http://www.clarkcountynv.gov

The updated fee schedules will take effect on 1/29/2020.

These updated fee schedules are also available on the Air Quality website at: http://www.clarkcountynv.gov

01-10-2020 - Public to Bird Springs Clean Up on Jan. 18

Commissioner Invites Public to Bird Springs Clean Up on Jan. 18

Commissioner Justin Jones is inviting anyone interested to join him in cleaning up the Bird Springs area from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Jan. 18.

"Southern Nevada has many scenic areas to enjoy, and it is up to us to keep them beautiful," Commissioner Jones said. "I want to thank Get Outdoors Nevada and the BLM for helping us with this cleanup, but most of all I want to thank all the residents who volunteer their time to help our community."

Anyone interested in volunteering is asked to register at GetOutdoorsNevada.org/events.

On Jan. 18, cleanup volunteers will meet at Starr Avenue and Rainbow Boulevard before heading out to Bird Springs, which is under the U.S. Bureau of Land Management.

Volunteers will be provided with cleanup supplies.

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 13th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

12/31/2019 - Air Advisory Issued Due to NYE Fireworks

Air Advisory Issued Due to NYE Fireworks

AirQuality-AdvSmoke

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued an advisory for smoke from fireworks on New Year's Eve and New Year's Day, Dec. 31 and Jan. 1.

Smoke is made of small particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases such as bronchitis and asthma or heart disease. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. Under today's conditions, it may be best for children, the elderly and people with respiratory and heart disease to stay indoors.

HELPFUL TIPS TO LIMIT PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO SMOKE

  • Limit outdoor exertion on days with high levels of fine particles in the air. Exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County.

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 13th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

12/23/2019 - Air Quality Advisory Issued for Fine Particles

Air Quality Advisory Issued for Fine Particles

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued an air quality advisory for high levels of fine particles (PM2.5) on Dec. 23, 2019, created primarily by stagnant air conditions. Air Quality officials say that small particles can aggravate respiratory diseases. PM2.5 is created by vehicle exhaust and smoke from wood burning.

People who may be most sensitive to elevated levels of fine particles include individuals with respiratory problems, cardiac disease, young children or senior citizens. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions.

HELPFUL TIPS TO LIMIT PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO FINE PARTICLES:

  • Limit outdoor exertion on days with high levels of fine particles in the air. Exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.

     
    STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION:

    The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People may stay informed through these channels:

     
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability.  With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year (2018). Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development

10/15/2019 - County Joins County Climate Coalition

County Joins County Climate Coalition

The Clark County Commission approved a resolution to join the County Climate Coalition at Tuesday's regular board meeting. The resolution mandates Clark County—under the direction of the Office of Sustainability—reduce local greenhouse gas emissions and take climate action. The move fulfills the first of several sustainability goals introduced by Commissioner Justin Jones at the Sept. 17 board meeting.

"While climate change is global threat, the responsibility for addressing climate change and making a meaningful impact to reduce greenhouse gas emissions must occur at the local level," said Jones. "With that in mind, joining the County Climate Coalition is an important step in continuing our efforts to tackle sustainability issues in Clark County."

By combating climate change through renewable solar energy development, alternative community energy providers, enhanced waste diversion, environmentally friendly vehicles, reduction of water usage and other local solutions, Clark County will continue its efforts to slow the pace of global warming while advancing environmental sustainability, protecting public health and leading innovation.

Next steps for Clark County's Office of Sustainability include hiring a manager, completing a countywide audit of sustainability efforts and adopting a Sustainability/Climate Action Plan.

About the County Climate Coalition
The County Climate Coalition was started in June 2017 by the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors to encourage other counties to commit to uphold the Paris Agreement. The County joined with The Climate Reality Project, an organization founded by former Vice President Al Gore, to engage other counties to make the same commitment to the Paris Agreement's carbon emissions reduction goals.

About the Office of Sustainability
Established in 2008, the Office of Sustainability is responsible for serving as a liaison to other entities, cultivating funding resources, creating a strategic marketing plan and promoting ongoing County conservation efforts. It focuses on improving quality of life in the community, natural resource conservation, economic vitality and public engagement.

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability.  With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year (2018). Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

10/14/2019 - MEDIA ADVISORY: Tortoises to be Released Back into the Desert

??MEDIA ADVISORY: Tortoises to be Released Back into the Desert

2006TortRescueCtr_13

Blink and you'll miss it! Clark County's Desert Conservation Program will release five desert tortoises back into the wild on Tuesday, Oct. 15. They will be released in the Boulder City Conservation Easement, south of Boulder City. The tortoises were recovered from construction sites earlier this year, thanks to a program made possible through the Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Program. To date, the MSHCP has invested more than $154 million in more than 600 conservation projects to minimize and mitigate the unintended negative impacts of growth and development on native sensitive species and habitats.

WhoClark County Desert Conservation Program
What: Tortoise Release
When: 9 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 15 
Where: Boulder City Conservation Easement, south of Boulder City (media may meet DCP staff at a kiosk at the corner of U.S. 95 and Nelson Road)

INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITIES

  • Kimberley Jenkins, principal environmental specialist, Desert Conservation Program
  • Scott Cambrin, senior biologist, Desert Conservation Program

PHOTO OPPORTUNITIES

  • Tortoises being reintroduced to their natural environs
  • Desert Conservation Program staff handling the tortoises and releasing them

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 Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability.  With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year (2018). Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

9/27/2019 - Air Quality Dust Advisory Issued for Saturday

Air Quality Dust Advisory Issued for Saturday

AirQuality-Final_AdvDust

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued a dust advisory for the afternoon and evening of Saturday, Sept. 28, to advise residents and local construction sites of the possibility of elevated levels of blowing dust due to the forecast of high winds in our area.

Airborne dust is a form of inhalable air pollution called particulate matter or PM, which aggravates respiratory diseases. Under windy conditions people with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children may feel better staying indoors as much as possible because they could be at greater risk from particulates, especially when they are physically active, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at redrock.ClarkCountyNV.gov/forecast. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org. The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people understand when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people.

Tips to limit exposure to dust include:

  • Limit outdoor exertion on windy days when dust is in the air. Exercise, for example, makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Run your air conditioner inside your house and car to filter out particulates.
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • To keep dust down, drive slowly on unpaved roads.
  • Don't take short cuts across vacant lots.
  • Ride off-road vehicles in approved areas outside the urban Las Vegas Valley.
  • Call Air Quality's dust complaint hotline at 702-385-DUST (3878) to report excessive amounts of blowing dust from construction sites, vacant lots or facilities.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability.  With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

9/23/2019 - Going Green: Clark County Re-commits to Sustainability

Air Quality Dust Advisory Issued for Tuesday

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued a dust advisory for Tuesday, April 2, to advise residents and local construction sites of the possibility of elevated levels of blowing dust due to the forecast of high winds in our area.

Sustainability-Logo-TransAirborne dust is a form of inhalable air pollution called particulate matter or PM, which aggravates respiratory diseases. Under windy conditions people with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children may feel better staying indoors as much as possible because they could be at greater risk from particulates, especially when they are physically active, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at redrock.ClarkCountyNV.gov/forecast. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org. The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people understand when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people. Tips to limit exposure to dust include:

  • Limit outdoor exertion on windy days when dust is in the air. Exercise, for example, makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Run your air conditioner inside your house and car to filter out particulates.
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • To keep dust down, drive slowly on unpaved roads.
  • Don't take short cuts across vacant lots.
  • Ride off-road vehicles in approved areas outside the urban Las Vegas Valley.
  • Call Air Quality's dust complaint hotline at 702-385-DUST (3878) to report excessive amounts of blowing dust from construction sites, vacant lots or facilities.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website:

  • AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability.  With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

6/20/2019 - Dust Advisory Issued Today

Air Quality Dust Advisory Issued for Today

AirQuality-Final_AdvDust

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued a dust advisory for Thursday, June 20, to advise residents and local construction sites of the possibility of elevated levels of blowing dust due to the forecast of high winds in our area.

Airborne dust is a form of inhalable air pollution called particulate matter or PM, which aggravates respiratory diseases. Under windy conditions people with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children may feel better staying indoors as much as possible because they could be at greater risk from particulates, especially when they are physically active, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at redrock.ClarkCountyNV.gov/forecast. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org. The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people understand when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people. Tips to limit exposure to dust include:

  • Limit outdoor exertion on windy days when dust is in the air. Exercise, for example, makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Run your air conditioner inside your house and car to filter out particulates.
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • To keep dust down, drive slowly on unpaved roads.
  • Don't take short cuts across vacant lots.
  • Ride off-road vehicles in approved areas outside the urban Las Vegas Valley.
  • Call Air Quality's dust complaint hotline at 702-385-DUST (3878) to report excessive amounts of blowing dust from construction sites, vacant lots or facilities.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability.  With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

4/26/2019 - Commissioner Jones Kicks Off Air Quality Awareness Week

Commissioner Jones to Kick Off Air Quality Awareness Week

County Commissioner Justin Jones will host a proclamation ceremony at 2 p.m. Monday, April 29 at the Clark County Government Center rotunda to officially kick off Air Quality Awareness Week. Representatives from the Department of Air Quality will also be in attendance. This year's theme is Check the AQI and Get Outside!

Who: Clark County Commissioner Justin Jones
What: Proclamation kicking off Air Quality Awareness Week
When: 2 p.m. Monday, April 29
Where: Clark County Government Center rotunda, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy.

For a complete list of Air Quality Awareness activities and information, go to http://bit.ly/2PnZH1p.

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability.  With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 9th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 951,000 residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

4/23/2019 - Check the AQI & Get Outside
AQAQ page banner??

Air Quality Wants You to  "Check the AQI & Get Outside"

National Air Quality Awareness Week is Monday, April 29 – Friday, May 3 and the Clark County Department of Air Quality will be active in the community and on social media under the national theme, Check the AQI and Get Outside.

"We all breathe the same air," said Air Quality Assistant Director Jodi Bechtel. "Air Quality Awareness Week provides us a great opportunity to specifically highlight the importance of clean air and how it impacts every facet of life in our community."

The Air Quality Index (AQI) is a measurement for reporting daily air quality and is color-coded to indicate how clean or polluted the air is and what associated health effects may be a concern. The AQI focuses on health effects people may experience within a few hours or days after breathing polluted air.

AQI Chart

Air Quality Awareness Week kicks off 2 p.m. Monday, April 29 at the Clark County Government Center Rotunda (500 S. Grand Central Pkwy.) when Commissioner Justin Jones will present an official proclamation to the Department of Air Quality.

A complete list of planned Air Quality Awareness Week public activities:

  • All week: Staff will visit CCSD schools to educate students about air quality issues.
  • Monday, April 29: Air Quality Awareness Week Proclamation, 2 p.m. at the Clark County Government Center rotunda, 500 S. Grand Central Parkway in downtown Las Vegas.
  • Tuesday, April 30: Operation Ozone, 6 – 8 p.m. at 7-Eleven, 7110 S. Durango Dr. Air Quality staff will be promoting ozone-reducing tips and thanking people for helping reduce ozone with prizes.
  • Thursday, May 2: Operation Ozone, 6 – 8 p.m. at 7-Eleven, 7110 S. Durango Dr. Air Quality staff will be promoting ozone-reducing tips and thanking people for helping reduce ozone with prizes.
  • Friday, May 3: First Friday, 5 – 11 p.m., downtown Las Vegas. Visit the Air Quality booth for prizes, "Plinko" and fun.
  • Saturday, May 4: Las Vegas Science and Technology Giant Expo, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., World Market Center. Answers to all your science-based air quality questions and more.

 
Air Quality's message to people at these events: our air quality better than it's ever been.

"Clark County's air quality is good and improving every year," said Bechtel. "Ozone, however, remains a challenge due to several factors and we will use Air Quality Awareness Week as an opportunity to share tips with people on how they can help reduce ozone."

A colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's atmosphere, ozone at the ground level is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year. Contributing factors include strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the EPA.

Tips to limit exposure to ozone and reduce its formation at ground level include:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example.
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip. 
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air. 

Go to our website for more information about Air Quality Awareness Week

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability.  With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

4/22/2019 - Clark County Ground-level Ozone Trending Downward

Clark County Ground-level Ozone Trending Downward

The air we share is improving in Clark County. An analysis of air quality data from 2003 – 2018 by Clark County's Department of Air Quality shows ozone exceedance days are trending downward. Last year's 35 exceedance days is a sharp decrease from 2003's 62 exceedance days. "Ozone season" for Clark County typically lasts from April 1 – Sept. 30 each year. What's leading to the downward trend? Several factors, according to Air Quality officials.

"Auto emissions continue to improve, which helps lower ground-level ozone," said Air Quality Planning Manager Mike Sword. "The Department of Air Quality also enforces strict compliance with federal, health-based standards on all permitted businesses in Clark County to ensure they are not emitting unhealthy amounts of pollutants into the air."

What is Ozone?
Ozone is a colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's upper atmosphere. At ground level, ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the EPA.

What is an Exceedance?
According to the Environmental Protection Agency's health-based standards, an exceedance occurs when ground-level ozone levels are higher than 70 parts per billion (ppb) over eight hours in a day. The current 70 ppb standard went into effect in August 2018. The previous standard of 75 ppb was used from 2008 – 18.

In 2018, Clark County has had a total of 35 ground-level ozone exceedance days—an increase over the previous five years due in part to local climate as well as wildfire smoke drifting into the region. Despite the increase, 2018 is still a sharp decline from 2003 – 2007 exceedance totals, which averaged 54 exceedance days per year.

"The 70 ppb standard certainly played a factor in exceedances last year," said Sword. "Also, wildfire smoke was much higher last year in Clark County than in recent years, which contributed to about half of our ozone exceedances."

Ozone Chart

Clark County is currently in "marginal" non-attainment status for ground-level ozone—the lowest classification—due in part to the EPA's implementation of the 70 ppb threshold this summer.

"For the Department of Air Quality, this new, lower bar by the EPA simply means we have to limbo lower, which we will do," said Sword. "We beat dust and we beat carbon monoxide. Now, we will beat ozone."

Helpful Tips to Reduce Ozone

  • Because cars, trucks and other vehicles are major contributors to ozone, people can follow these helpful, everyday tips to reduce ozone:
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

 Also, if you have respiratory issues or other health concerns, consider these tips during ozone season:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walking instead of jogging, for example.
  • Always consult your doctor first for medical advice.

###

 Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability.  With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

4/19/2019 - Air Quality Dust Advisory Issued for Saturday

Air Quality Dust Advisory Issued for Saturday

AirQuality-Final_AdvDust

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued a dust advisory for Saturday, April 20, to advise residents and local construction sites of the possibility of elevated levels of blowing dust due to the forecast of high winds in our area. Blowing dust may occur in Clark County Saturday afternoon and evening, due to strong winds originating in the Mojave Desert.

Airborne dust is a form of inhalable air pollution called particulate matter or PM, which aggravates respiratory diseases. Under windy conditions people with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children may feel better staying indoors as much as possible because they could be at greater risk from particulates, especially when they are physically active, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at redrock.ClarkCountyNV.gov/forecast. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org. The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people understand when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people.

Tips to limit exposure to dust include:

  • Limit outdoor exertion on windy days when dust is in the air. Exercise, for example, makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Run your air conditioner inside your house and car to filter out particulates.
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • To keep dust down, drive slowly on unpaved roads.
  • Don't take short cuts across vacant lots.
  • Ride off-road vehicles in approved areas outside the urban Las Vegas Valley.
  • Call Air Quality's dust complaint hotline at 702-385-DUST (3878) to report excessive amounts of blowing dust from construction sites, vacant lots or facilities.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability.  With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

4/8/2019 - Dust Advisory for Tuesday, April 9

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Air Quality Dust Advisory Issued for Tuesday, April 9

AirQuality-Final_AdvDust

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued a dust advisory for Tuesday, April 9, to advise residents and local construction sites of the possibility of elevated levels of blowing dust due to the forecast of high winds in our area.

Airborne dust is a form of inhalable air pollution called particulate matter or PM, which aggravates respiratory diseases. Under windy conditions people with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children may feel better staying indoors as much as possible because they could be at greater risk from particulates, especially when they are physically active, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at redrock.ClarkCountyNV.gov/forecast. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org. The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people understand when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people.

Tips to limit exposure to dust include:

  • Limit outdoor exertion on windy days when dust is in the air. Exercise, for example, makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Run your air conditioner inside your house and car to filter out particulates.
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • To keep dust down, drive slowly on unpaved roads.
  • Don't take short cuts across vacant lots.
  • Ride off-road vehicles in approved areas outside the urban Las Vegas Valley.
  • Call Air Quality's dust complaint hotline at 702-385-DUST (3878) to report excessive amounts of blowing dust from construction sites, vacant lots or facilities.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website:

  • AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability.  With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

4/1/2019 - Dust Advisory Issued for Tuesday

??Air Quality Dust Advisory Issued for Tuesday

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued a dust advisory for Tuesday, April 2, to advise residents and local construction sites of the possibility of elevated levels of blowing dust due to the forecast of high winds in our area.

AirQuality-Final_AdvDust

Airborne dust is a form of inhalable air pollution called particulate matter or PM, which aggravates respiratory diseases. Under windy conditions people with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children may feel better staying indoors as much as possible because they could be at greater risk from particulates, especially when they are physically active, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at redrock.ClarkCountyNV.gov/forecast. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org. The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people understand when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people. Tips to limit exposure to dust include:

  • Limit outdoor exertion on windy days when dust is in the air. Exercise, for example, makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Run your air conditioner inside your house and car to filter out particulates.
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • To keep dust down, drive slowly on unpaved roads.
  • Don't take short cuts across vacant lots.
  • Ride off-road vehicles in approved areas outside the urban Las Vegas Valley.
  • Call Air Quality's dust complaint hotline at 702-385-DUST (3878) to report excessive amounts of blowing dust from construction sites, vacant lots or facilities.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website:

  • AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability.  With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

3/29/2019 - 2019 Seasonal Ozone

Seasonal Ozone Advisory Issued Through Sept. 30

The Clark County Department of Air Quality issued a season-long advisory for ground-level ozone pollution today that will be in effect from Monday, April 1 – Monday, Sept. 30.

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

Ozone is a colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's upper atmosphere. At ground level, ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the EPA.

"The Department of Air Quality is enforcing the EPA's health-based standards to minimize ozone and other pollutants, but people in our community can also take steps to help reduce ozone," said Department of Air Quality Director Marci Henson. "Filling your gas tank before sunrise or after sunset, using public transportation and avoiding unnecessary idling of vehicles are just a few ways people can help protect the air we share."

HELPFUL TIPS TO REDUCE OZONE

Because cars, trucks and other vehicles are major contributors to ozone, people can follow these helpful, everyday tips to reduce ozone:

  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air. 

    Also, if you have respiratory issues or other health concerns, consider these tips during ozone season:
  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walking instead of jogging, for example.
  • Always consult your doctor first for medical advice.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of 14 monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability.  With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to 2.3 million citizens and 45.3 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

3/1/2019 - Fee Adjustment 2019

This notice is being provided for interested parties in an effort to ensure all stationary sources that maintain a valid Air Quality Operating Permit, and all current holders of a Dust Control Permit issued by Clark County Department of Air Quality receive advance notice of the upcoming updates to the fee schedules.

Each year, the Section 18 fees are adjusted to reflect the change in the Urban Consumer Price Index for the previous year (2018).

The current fee schedule are available on the Air Quality website: http://www.clarkcountynv.gov/AirQuality/Pages/FeeSchedule.aspx .

The updated fee schedules will take effect on 3/1/2019.
These updated fee schedules are also available on the Air Quality website at:
http://www.clarkcountynv.gov/airquality/regulations/Pages/Rules_ProposedRevisions.aspx

Payments received in envelopes postmarked on 3/1/2019 will be assessed the new fees. Thank you for your attention in this matter.
2/21/2019 - Feb. 27 OHV Meeting Canceled

The regularly scheduled meeting of the Clark County Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation Advisory Committee (Advisory Committee) for Wednesday, Feb. 27 has been canceled. The next meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, March 27, 4 – 6 p.m. at the Clark County Government Center in the Pueblo Room on the first floor.

The meeting is being canceled to allow members of the Advisory Committee an opportunity to further engage their constituents in the OHV community on a recommendation that the Board of County Commissioners adopt a resolution urging the Nevada Congressional Delegation to enact federal legislation that will designate three off-highway vehicle recreation areas in Clark County, Nevada.

Included below is the proposed resolution and map that the committee unanimously voted to present to the Board of County Commissioners at its Feb. 19 meeting. This item was deleted from the Board of County Commissioner's agenda at its Feb. 19 meeting.

Following feedback from a variety of stakeholders, it became apparent that the original proposal needed additional vetting through OHV constituent groups and potential revisions needed to be considered by the Advisory Committee. Also included below is a staff presentation that provides an overview of the proposal and identifies some of concerns raised to the County by environmental stakeholders regarding the proposed OHV recreation areas and potential ways to remedy those concerns.

Additional Materials:
Board of County Commissioners agenda item
Proposed resolution
Original map
Staff overview presentation, including concerns and potential remedies
Potential revised map to address concerns

Please reach out to your OHV contacts and organizations to:

  • Notify them of the meeting cancelation
  • Inform them of the next meeting on March 27
  • Review the materials and confer with interested parties.

Members of the Advisory Committee should please be mindful of Nevada Open Meeting Law and refrain from establishing a walking quorum, engaging in serial communications or other violations.

Reconsideration of this proposal will be on the agenda for the March 27 meeting.

2/12/2019 - List Server

Air Quality's new 'List Server' feature

Air Quality is introducing a new feature called a 'List Server'. A link to the List Server is located on our website which will allow interested persons to sign-up for various categories of email notifications and alerts from Air Quality.  Once signed up, individuals will receive email notifications on public notices for permitting actions, Air Quality advisories and alerts, construction notices, regulatory notices for workshops/public comment/public hearing, and Small Business Assistance notices, based on the categories selected. Separate email distribution lists will be maintained for each category.

Click the link below to register to receive email notifications from Air Quality.

Air Quality Email List Server

1/8/2019 - Public Hearing for Permitting Action

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

FOR

Wells Cargo Incorporated, Source ID: 00012

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Clark County Department of Air Quality has received an application to revise the air quality operating permit for an existing stationary source of regulated air pollutants operated by Wells Cargo, Inc. The source consists of an aggregate processing facility and hot mix asphalt plant located at 7770 West Spring Mountain Road, Las Vegas, Nevada 89117.

NOTICE IS ALSO HEREBY GIVEN that the Department of Air Quality, pursuant to Section 12.1.5.3(b)(1) of the Air Quality Regulations, will hold a public hearing to allow any person to provide oral and written comments on the application. If you wish to speak at the public hearing regarding this application, please fill out a public comment card (available at the hearing) and submit the comment card to staff when you approach the speaker's microphone. Please step up to the speaker's microphone, clearly state your name and address, and spell your last name for the record. Comments will be limited to three minutes per speaker.

The public hearing will be conducted as follows:
Date: Thursday, January 17, 2019
Time: Beginning 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m.
Address: Clark County Operations Center West, 4701 W Russell Road, Las Vegas, NV 89118
Room: Presentation Room, 1st Floor (Direct entry from outside - North side of building)

12/6/2018 - Air Quality Map Assistant

A new online mapping program is now available for the public that shows areas covered under Dust Control Operating Permits (DCOPs). This program functions similarly to OpenWeb. However, it includes an additional feature, the dust permit layer which displays all of the areas covered under active DCOPs.

Prior to submitting a DCOP application, please review the area on the AQ Map Assistant to verify that it is not already permitted. Air Quality does not allow multiple permittees to pull DCOPs for the same area unless there are extenuating circumstances.

The program can be accessed on the Air Quality Dust Control Applications & Forms page.

If you have any questions regarding the new AQ Map Assistant, please use the contact information listed above.

11/20/2018 - Air Quality Front Counter Announcement

Air Quality Front Counter will be closed on: 12/05/2018 from 11:45 AM to 1:15 PM, due to an office event. We appreciate your patronage.

Thank you

10/11/2018 - Mineral/Aggregate Processing Permitting Online Tool

An online tool for permitting mineral and aggregate processing operations is available to customers preparing stationary source applications for new, renewed, and revised air quality permits. This tool combines equipment information and automated emissions calculations into one convenient worksheet that can be printed and included with applications submitted to the Clark County Department of Air Quality (DAQ).

Applicants should begin using this online tool instead of the Mineral Processing worksheet, which will be available for a limited time only. This new online tool can be found where all stationary source permit forms are listed on DAQ's websiteEffective January 1, 2019, DAQ will not accept any application for mineral processing that does not use this tool for emission unit information and calculations.

Questions can be answered by emailing or calling DAQ Permitting using the contact information listed above.

8/17/2018 - Ozone Advisory Issued for Saturday and Sunday

Ozone Advisory Issued for Saturday and Sunday

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

The Clark County Department of Air Quality (DAQ) is issuing an advisory for ground-level ozone pollution, effective Saturday, Aug. 18 – Sunday, Aug. 19. In addition to local weather conditions, smoke from California wildfires moving into the region is also a factor this weekend.

Ozone is a colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's upper atmosphere. At ground level, ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the EPA.

HELPFUL TIPS TO REDUCE OZONE

Because cars, trucks and other vehicles are major contributors to ozone, people can follow these helpful, everyday tips to reduce ozone:

  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air. 

Also, if you have respiratory issues or other health concerns, consider these tips during ozone season:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walking instead of jogging, for example.
  • Always consult your doctor first for medical advice.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

8/14/2018 - MEDIA ADVISORY: Local Drivers Rewarded for Ozone-reducing Practices

MEDIA ADVISORY:
Local Drivers Rewarded for Ozone-reducing Practices

Did you know fueling up your gas tank after sunset helps reduce the toxic pollutant ozone? In an effort to promote this and other ozone-reducing practices, Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) will spend the next seven weeks rewarding drivers at randomly selected gas stations throughout the Las Vegas valley. Its first visit is Tuesday, Aug. 14 at the 7-Eleven/Sinclair gas station located at 7111 S. Durango Dr.

Who: Clark County Air Quality "Street Team"
What: Ozone Street Team Giveaway
When: 6 – 8 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 14
Where: 7-Eleven/Sinclair gas station, 7110 S. Durango Dr., southeast corner of Durango Drive and West Arby Avenue, south of the 215 Beltway.

INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITIES

  • Kevin MacDonald, Department of Air Quality, will answer questions from the media.
  • Pawan Nanda of S&S Fuels will be available for questions.

PHOTO OPPORTUNITIES

  • Air Quality staff will be handing out free gifts to drivers gassing up their vehicles.
  • Gas station employees will also provide promotional items to patrons.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

8/9/2018 - Air Quality Advisory Issued for Smoke

Air Quality Advisory Issued for Smoke

AirQuality-AdvSmoke

The Clark County Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued a smoke advisory from Thursday, Aug. 9 – Monday, Aug. 13. Smoke from California wildfires continues to move into the region contributing to visible haze and higher amounts of particulate matter.

Smoke is made of small particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases such as bronchitis and asthma or heart disease. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions. Under today's conditions, it may be best for children, the elderly and people with respiratory and heart disease to stay indoors.

HELPFUL TIPS TO LIMIT PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO SMOKE

  • Limit outdoor exertion on days with high levels of fine particles in the air. Exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:
  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

8/6/2018 - Wildfire Smoke Forces Advisory Extension

Wildfire Smoke Forces Advisory Extension

AirQuality-Final_AdvS-O

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) is extending its smoke and ozone advisory to include Monday, Aug. 6 – Wednesday, Aug. 8. Smoke from California wildfires continues to move into the region which, combined with local weather conditions, may increase ground level ozone for the next few days. The wildfire smoke may also contribute to elevated levels of particulate matter (PM2.5) for our region today.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, people who may be most sensitive to elevated levels of particulates and ozone include individuals with respiratory problems, cardiac disease, young children or senior citizens. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions.

Smoke is made of small particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Exposure to ozone can induce coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath even in healthy people. A seasonal ozone advisory is currently in effect.
 
SMOKE AND OZONE TIPS

  • Stay indoors when you smell or see smoke.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example.
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

 STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

08-03-2018 - Smoke, Ozone Advisory Extended Thru Sunday

Smoke, Ozone Advisory Extended Thru Sunday

AirQuality-Final_AdvS-O

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) is extending its smoke and ozone advisory to include Friday, Aug. 3 – Sunday, Aug. 5. In addition to local weather conditions, smoke from California wildfires moving into the region is also a factor this weekend.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, people who may be most sensitive to elevated levels of particles and ozone include individuals with respiratory problems, cardiac disease, young children or senior citizens. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions.

Exposure to ozone can induce coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath even in healthy people. A seasonal ozone advisory is currently in effect.
 
SMOKE AND OZONE TIPS

  • Stay indoors when you smell or see smoke.
  • Limit outdoor activity and exertion when ozone levels are elevated – exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you may inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed. Run your air conditioner inside your house and car. Air conditioning filters out smoke and particles.
  • Change your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example.
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

 STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

08-02-2018 - Smoke, Ozone Advisory Extended Thru Friday

Smoke, Ozone Advisory Extended Thru Friday

AirQuality-Final_AdvS-O

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) is extending its smoke and ozone advisory to include Thursday, Aug. 2 and Friday, Aug. 3. Elevated levels of smoke and ozone are forecast to continue for southern Nevada. Air Quality officials cite wildfire smoke from California contributing to elevated levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone in the region. Local weather conditions continue to favor ground-level ozone formation, but wildfire smoke can also be a contributing factor.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, people who may be most sensitive to elevated levels of particles and ozone include individuals with respiratory problems, cardiac disease, young children or senior citizens. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions.

Exposure to ozone can induce coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath even in healthy people. A seasonal ozone advisory is currently in effect.

SMOKE AND OZONE TIPS

  • Stay indoors when you smell or see smoke
  • Limit outdoor activity and exertion when ozone levels are elevated – exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you may inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed. Run your air conditioner inside your house and car. Air conditioning filters out smoke and particles.
  • Change your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example.
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

7/31/2018 - Smoke, Ozone Advisory Issued Thru Wednesday

Smoke, Ozone Advisory Issued Thru Wednesday

AirQuality-Final_AdvS-O

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) is issuing an advisory for Tuesday, July 31 – Wednesday, Aug. 1. Elevated levels of smoke and ozone are forecast for southern Nevada, due to wildfires in California and Arizona, Air Quality officials said. Smoke is comprised of small dust particles that can contribute to ground-level ozone formation.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, people who may be most sensitive to elevated levels of particles and ozone include individuals with respiratory problems, cardiac disease, young children or senior citizens. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions.

Exposure to ozone can induce coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath even in healthy people. A seasonal ozone advisory is currently in effect.
 
SMOKE AND OZONE TIPS

  • Stay indoors when you smell or see smoke.
  • Limit outdoor activity and exertion when ozone levels are elevated – exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you may inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed. Run your air conditioner inside your house and car. Air conditioning filters out smoke and particles.
  • Change your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example.
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

7/27/2018 - Air Quality Issues Ozone Advisory Through Weekend

Air Quality Issues Ozone Advisory Through Weekend

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

The Clark County Department of Air Quality is issuing an advisory for ground-level ozone pollution that will be in effective Friday, July 27 – Sunday, July 29. In addition to local weather conditions, smoke from California wildfires moving into the region is also a factor this weekend.

Ozone is a colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's upper atmosphere. At ground level, ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the EPA.

HELPFUL TIPS TO REDUCE OZONE

Because cars, trucks and other vehicles are major contributors to ozone, people can follow these helpful, everyday tips to reduce ozone:

  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

Also, if you have respiratory issues or other health concerns, consider these tips during ozone season:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walking instead of jogging, for example.
  • Always consult your doctor first for medical advice.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

7/24/2018 - ​Ozone Advisory Extended Through Wednesday

Ozone Advisory Extended Through Wednesday

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

The Clark County Department of Air Quality is extending its current advisory for ground-level ozone pollution to continue through Wednesday, July 25. The original ozone advisory was set to expire today.

Ozone is a colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's upper atmosphere. At ground level, ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the EPA.

HELPFUL TIPS TO REDUCE OZONE

Because cars, trucks and other vehicles are major contributors to ozone, people can follow these helpful, everyday tips to reduce ozone:

  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

 Also, if you have respiratory issues or other health concerns, consider these tips during ozone season:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walking instead of jogging, for example.
  • Always consult your doctor first for medical advice.

 
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

7/23/2018 - Ozone Advisory Issued for Monday and Tuesday

Ozone Advisory Issued for Monday and Tuesday

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

The Clark County Department of Air Quality issued an advisory for ground-level ozone pollution, in effect Monday, July 23 – Tuesday, July 24.

Ozone is a colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's upper atmosphere. At ground level, ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the EPA.

HELPFUL TIPS TO REDUCE OZONE

Because cars, trucks and other vehicles are major contributors to ozone, people can follow these helpful, everyday tips to reduce ozone:

  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

Also, if you have respiratory issues or other health concerns, consider these tips during ozone season:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walking instead of jogging, for example.
  • Always consult your doctor first for medical advice.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

7/17/2018 - Ozone Advisory Extended Through Wednesday

Ozone Advisory Extended Through Wednesday

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

The Clark County Department of Air Quality is extending its advisory for ground-level ozone pollution to include Tuesday, July 17 and Wednesday, July 18. The advisory, issued yesterday, now includes smoke from regional wildfires moving into the area as a contributing factor.

Ozone is a colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's upper atmosphere. At ground level, ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the EPA.

HELPFUL TIPS TO REDUCE OZONE

Because cars, trucks and other vehicles are major contributors to ozone, people can follow these helpful, everyday tips to reduce ozone:

  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air. 

Also, if you have respiratory issues or other health concerns, consider these tips during ozone season:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walking instead of jogging, for example.
  • Always consult your doctor first for medical advice.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

7/16/2018 - Air Quality Issues Ozone Advisory for Monday

Air Quality Issues Ozone Advisory for Monday

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

The Clark County Department of Air Quality issued an advisory for ground-level ozone pollution for Monday, July 16.

Ozone is a colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's upper atmosphere. At ground level, ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the EPA.

HELPFUL TIPS TO REDUCE OZONE

Because cars, trucks and other vehicles are major contributors to ozone, people can follow these helpful, everyday tips to reduce ozone:

  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

Also, if you have respiratory issues or other health concerns, consider these tips during ozone season:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walking instead of jogging, for example.
  • Always consult your doctor first for medical advice.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

### 

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

7/11/2018 - ​Air Quality Issues Ozone Advisory for Wednesday

Air Quality Issues Ozone Advisory for Wednesday

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

The Clark County Department of Air Quality issued an advisory for ground-level ozone pollution for Wednesday, July 11.

Ozone is a colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's upper atmosphere. At ground level, ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the EPA.

HELPFUL TIPS TO REDUCE OZONE

Because cars, trucks and other vehicles are major contributors to ozone, people can follow these helpful, everyday tips to reduce ozone:

  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

Also, if you have respiratory issues or other health concerns, consider these tips during ozone season:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walking instead of jogging, for example.
  • Always consult your doctor first for medical advice.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

 ### 

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

7/9/2018 - Air Quality Dust Advisory Issued for Monday

Air Quality Dust Advisory Issued for Monday

AirQuality-Final_AdvDust

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued a dust advisory for Monday, July 9, to advise residents and local construction sites of the possibility of elevated levels of dust due to outflow boundaries created by thunderstorms over Arizona transporting dust into area.

Airborne dust is a form of inhalable air pollution called particulate matter or PM, which aggravates respiratory diseases. Under windy conditions people with heart or lung disease, older adults, and children may feel better staying indoors as much as possible because they could be at greater risk from particulates, especially when they are physically active, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at redrock.ClarkCountyNV.gov/forecast. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org. The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people understand when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people. Tips to limit exposure to dust include:

  • Limit outdoor exertion on windy days when dust is in the air. Exercise, for example, makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Run your air conditioner inside your house and car to filter out particulates.
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • To keep dust down, drive slowly on unpaved roads.
  • Don't take short cuts across vacant lots.
  • Ride off-road vehicles in approved areas outside the urban Las Vegas Valley.
  • Call Air Quality's dust complaint hotline at 702-385-DUST (3878) to report excessive amounts of blowing dust from construction sites, vacant lots or facilities.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

7/6/2018 - Air Quality Issues Ozone Advisory for Friday
Contact: Kevin J MacDonald
Phone: 702-455-6131
Email: kevmac@ClarkCountyNV.gov

Air Quality Issues Ozone Advisory for Friday

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

The Clark County Department of Air Quality issued an advisory for ground-level ozone pollution today that will be in effect for Friday, July 6.

Ozone is a colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's upper atmosphere. At ground level, ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the EPA.

HELPFUL TIPS TO REDUCE OZONE

Because cars, trucks and other vehicles are major contributors to ozone, people can follow these helpful, everyday tips to reduce ozone:

  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

Also, if you have respiratory issues or other health concerns, consider these tips during ozone season:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walking instead of jogging, for example.
  • Always consult your doctor first for medical advice.

STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION

The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website, AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov.

People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air Quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

 ###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

7/2/2018 - Smoke, Ozone Advisory Issued Due to Fireworks
Contact: Kevin J MacDonald
Phone: 702-455-6131
Email: kevmac@ClarkCountyNV.gov

Smoke, Ozone Advisory Issued Due to Fireworks

AirQuality-Final_AdvS-O

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) is issuing an advisory for Wednesday, July 4 – Thursday, July 5, for potentially elevated levels of smoke and ozone due to local fireworks. Air Quality officials say smoke is made of small dust particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, people who may be most sensitive to elevated levels of particulates and ozone include individuals with respiratory problems, cardiac disease, young children or senior citizens. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air quality conditions.

Smoke is made of small particles and other pollutants that can aggravate respiratory diseases and contribute to ground-level ozone formation. Exposure to ozone can induce coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath even in healthy people. A seasonal ozone advisory is currently in effect.

Detailed current and past information on air quality conditions is posted in the monitoring section of the DAQ website: http://redrock.clarkcountynv.gov/forecast/. You can receive free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text message through Enviroflash service. Subscription information is available at www.enviroflash.org

SMOKE AND OZONE TIPS

  • Stay indoors when you smell or see smoke
  • Limit outdoor activity and exertion when ozone levels are elevated – exercise makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you may inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed. Run your air conditioner inside your house and car. Air conditioning filters out smoke and particles.
  • Change your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example.
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 46 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

6/29/2018 - Ozone Advisory Issued for Saturday and Sunday
Contact: Kevin J MacDonald
Phone: 702-455-6131
Email: kevmac@ClarkCountyNV.gov

Ozone Advisory Issued for Saturday and Sunday

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued an ozone advisory for Saturday, June 30 – Sunday, July 1. Expected weather conditions and existing levels of other pollutants may trigger the formation of ground-level ozone pollution in the Las Vegas Valley.

Ground-level ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog during the hottest months of the year. A seasonal advisory is in effect in the Las Vegas Valley from April through September when ozone can build up during daytime hours because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. People who may be most sensitive to ozone include individuals with lung disease such as asthma, emphysema or chronic bronchitis, older adults, children, and active people who exercise or work vigorously outdoors. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and if necessary will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at http://redrock.clarkcountynv.gov/forecast/. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org

The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people know when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people.

Tips to limit exposure to ozone and reduce its formation at ground level include:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example.
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip. 
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

 ###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 46 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

06-27-2018 - Ozone Advisory Extended for Wednesday
Contact: Kevin J MacDonald
Phone: 702-455-6131
Email: kevmac@ClarkCountyNV.gov


Ozone Advisory Extended for Wednesday

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has extended the ozone advisory for Wednesday, June 27. Current weather conditions and lingering wildfire smoke are expected to contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone pollution in the Las Vegas Valley.

Ground-level ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog during the hottest months of the year. A seasonal advisory is in effect in the Las Vegas Valley from April through September when ozone can build up during daytime hours because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. People who may be most sensitive to ozone include individuals with lung disease such as asthma, emphysema or chronic bronchitis, older adults, children, and active people who exercise or work vigorously outdoors. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and if necessary will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at http://redrock.clarkcountynv.gov/forecast/. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org

The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people know when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people. Tips to limit exposure to ozone and reduce its formation at ground level include:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example.
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip. 
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

 ###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 46 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

6/25/2018 - Monday Ozone
Contact: Kevin J MacDonald
Phone: 702-455-6131
Email: kevmac@ClarkCountyNV.gov


Ozone Advisory Extended for Monday and Tuesday

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued an ozone advisory for Monday, June 25 – Tuesday, June 26. Current weather conditions and lingering weekend smoke are expected to contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone pollution in the Las Vegas Valley.

Ground-level ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog during the hottest months of the year. A seasonal advisory is in effect in the Las Vegas Valley from April through September when ozone can build up during daytime hours because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. People who may be most sensitive to ozone include individuals with lung disease such as asthma, emphysema or chronic bronchitis, older adults, children, and active people who exercise or work vigorously outdoors. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and if necessary will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at http://redrock.clarkcountynv.gov/forecast/. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org
The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people know when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people.

Tips to limit exposure to ozone and reduce its formation at ground level include:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example.
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip. 
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 46 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

6/22/2018 - Ozone Advisory Extended Through Saturday
Contact: Kevin J MacDonald
Phone: 702-455-6131
Email: kevmac@ClarkCountyNV.gov


Air Quality Ozone Advisory Extended Through Saturday, June 23

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has extended its ozone advisory issued for today and Thursday through Saturday, June 23. Elevated levels of ozone are expected due to light, easterly winds contributing to the formation of ground-level ozone in the Las Vegas Valley.

Ground-level ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog during the hottest months of the year. A seasonal advisory is in effect in the Las Vegas Valley from April through September when ozone can build up during daytime hours because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. People who may be most sensitive to ozone include individuals with lung disease such as asthma, emphysema or chronic bronchitis, older adults, children, and active people who exercise or work vigorously outdoors. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and if necessary will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at http://redrock.clarkcountynv.gov/forecast/. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org
The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people know when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people. Tips to limit exposure to ozone and reduce its formation at ground level include:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example.
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip. 
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 46 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

06-21-2018 - Ozone Advisory Extended for Thursday and Friday
Contact: Kevin J MacDonald
Phone: 702-455-6131
Email: kevmac@ClarkCountyNV.gov


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Ozone Advisory Extended for Thursday and Friday

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued an ozone advisory for Thursday, June 21 – Friday, June 22. Elevated levels of ozone are expected due to initially light winds contributing to the formation of ground-level ozone in the Las Vegas Valley in addition to southwesterly winds transporting ozone and precursor pollutants from southern California.

Ground-level ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog during the hottest months of the year. A seasonal advisory is in effect in the Las Vegas Valley from April through September when ozone can build up during daytime hours because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. People who may be most sensitive to ozone include individuals with lung disease such as asthma, emphysema or chronic bronchitis, older adults, children, and active people who exercise or work vigorously outdoors. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and if necessary will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at http://redrock.clarkcountynv.gov/forecast/. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org
The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people know when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people.

Tips to limit exposure to ozone and reduce its formation at ground level include:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example.
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip. 
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

 ###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 46 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

6/20/2018 - Air Quality Advisory Issued For Ozone
Contact: Kevin J MacDonald
Phone: 702-455-6131
Email: kevmac@clarkcountynv.gov

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Air Quality Advisory Issued For Ozone

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued an advisory for Wednesday, Jun. 20, for potentially elevated levels of ozone due to current weather conditions that contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone in the Las Vegas Valley.

Ground-level ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog during the hottest months of the year. A seasonal advisory is in effect in the Las Vegas Valley from April through September when ozone can build up during daytime hours because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. People who may be most sensitive to ozone include individuals with lung disease such as asthma, emphysema or chronic bronchitis, older adults, children, and active people who exercise or work vigorously outdoors. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and if necessary will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at http://redrock.clarkcountynv.gov/forecast/. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org
The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people know when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people.

Tips to limit exposure to ozone and reduce its formation at ground level include:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walk instead of jog, for example.
  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip. 
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up, and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

 ###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 46 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

6/1/2018 - New Mineral/Aggregate Processing Permitting Tool

??MINERAL/AGGREGATE PROCESSING PERMITTING TOOL

AVAILABLE FOR USE

An online tool for permitting mineral and aggregate processing operations is available to customers preparing applications for new, renewed, and revised air quality permits. This new tool combines equipment information and emissions calculations into one convenient worksheet that can be printed and included with air quality permit applications submitted to the Clark County Department of Air Quality.

Applicants should use the new online tool instead of the Emission Unit Worksheet for Mineral Processing that was previously available. This new online tool can be found where all stationary source permit forms are available on Air Quality's website.

Customers can refer to the May 4, 2018 workshop presentation for additional information. They can also get their questions answered by emailing or calling Air Quality Permitting using the contact information listed above.

5/2/2018 - Clark County Air Quality is Safe, Despite New EPA Designation

??Clark County Air Quality is Safe, Despite New EPA Designation

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency cited Clark County for "non-attainment" of its new ozone pollution standard this week. The classification is no cause for alarm or concern, according to Clark County Dept. of Air Quality officials.

"We are not producing more ground-level ozone pollution in Clark County," said Department of Air Quality Director Marci Henson. "The EPA lowered the standard—which we expected—and now we will continue to strive to minimize air pollution as we have always done. It's like the dance, the limbo. The EPA lowered the bar and we have to limbo a little lower now."

Seventy Parts per Billion
On Monday, the EPA took steps to implement the national air quality standards for ozone that were issued in 2015. As a result, Clark County was designated as for "non-attainment" for ozone. The new, eight-hour standard for ground-level ozone is 70 parts per billion (ppb), a reduction from the previous 75 ppb standard.

"We averaged about 74 parts per billion last year," Henson said. "That is consistent with our downward trend for ground-level ozone."

What is Ozone?
Ozone is a colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's upper atmosphere. At ground level, ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the EPA.

Clark County's non-attainment status is listed as "marginal," by the EPA, which is the lowest of five classifications. In addition to enforcing compliance with EPA regulations on regional business and industry, Air Quality continues to monitor and report on air quality to inform the public of issues with ozone, dust, smoke and other pollutants. Clark County is currently under a seasonal ozone advisory until Sept. 30.

"This new designation from the EPA doesn't change our mission or our goals," Henson said. "The Air Quality staff will continue to develop solutions that we're confident will help us achieve attainment status within the next few years."

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

4/6/2018 - Dust Advisory for Clark County on Saturday, April 7

??Air Quality Issues Dust Advisory for Saturday

AirQuality-Final_AdvDust.jpgClark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued a dust advisory for Saturday, April 7, to advise residents and local construction sites of the possibility of elevated levels of blowing dust due to the forecast of high winds in our area.

Airborne dust is a form of inhalable air pollution called particulate matter, or PM, which aggravates respiratory diseases. Under windy conditions people with heart or lung disease, older adults and children may feel better staying indoors as much as possible because they could be at greater risk from particulates, especially when they are physically active, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at http://redrock.clarkcountynv.gov/forecast/. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org. The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people understand when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people. Tips to limit exposure to dust include:

  • Limit outdoor exertion on windy days when dust is in the air. Exercise, for example, makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Run your air conditioner inside your house and car to filter out particulates.
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • To keep dust down, drive slowly on unpaved roads.
  • Don't take short cuts across vacant lots.
  • Ride off-road vehicles in approved areas outside the urban Las Vegas Valley.
  • Call Air Quality's dust-complaint hotline at 702-385-DUST (3878) to report excessive amounts of blowing dust from construction sites, vacant lots or facilities.
    ###

    Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.
3/30/2018 - Seasonal Ozone Advisory Issued Through Sept. 30

??Seasonal Ozone Advisory Issued Through Sept. 30

AirQuality-Final_AdvOzone.jpgThe Clark County Department of Air Quality issued a season-long advisory for ground-level ozone pollution today that will be in effect from Sunday, April 1 – Sunday, Sept. 30.

Ozone is a colorless gas that exists naturally in the Earth's upper atmosphere. At ground level, ozone is a key ingredient of urban smog that can build up during the day in the hottest months of the year because of strong sunlight, hot temperatures, gasoline and chemical vapors, and pollutants from automobiles, wildfires and regional transport. Exposure to ozone can irritate your respiratory system and cause coughing, a sore throat, chest pain and shortness of breath even in healthy people, according to the EPA.

"Through a combined effort from local agencies, industry and individuals, the air quality in Clark County continues to improve each year," said Department of Air Quality Director Marci Henson. "While we at Air Quality continue to enforce the EPA standards on ozone and other pollutants in the interest of the our residents and visitors, the people of Clark County can also play an important role in minimizing ground-level ozone."

HELPFUL TIPS TO REDUCE OZONE
Because cars, trucks and other vehicles are major contributors to ozone, people can follow these helpful, everyday tips to reduce ozone:

  • Reduce driving – combine errands into one trip.
  • Don't idle your car engine unnecessarily.
  • Use mass transit or carpool.
  • Fill up your gas tank after sunset. Try not to spill gasoline when filling up and don't top off your tank.
  • Keep your car well maintained.
  • Consider landscaping that uses less water and gas-powered equipment to maintain.
  • Turn off lights and electronics when not in use. Less fuel burned at power plants means cleaner air.

Also, if you have respiratory issues or other health concerns, consider these tips during ozone season:

  • Reduce the time you are active outdoors when ozone levels are elevated, especially if you are engaged in a strenuous activity or have a respiratory disease.
  • Schedule activities for the morning or evening when ozone levels are usually lower.
  • Substitute a less intense activity – walking instead of jogging, for example.
  • Always consult your doctor first for medical advice.

 
STAY UP TO DATE WITH AIR QUALITY INFORMATION
The Department of Air Quality monitors air pollution through a network of 14 monitoring sites throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data is collected from these sites and reported at our monitoring website: AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov. People can stay informed through a couple channels:

  • Twitter and Facebook: Read air quality updates in your Facebook news feed or tweets. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ClarkCountyAirQuality and Twitter: @CCAirQuality.
  • EnviroFlash: Receive daily text or email messages with the latest air quality information. Learn more at www.enviroflash.org. Air quality also issues advisories and alerts for ozone and other pollutants such as dust, smoke and other particulate matters.
  • AIRNow: Check air quality forecasts, current conditions and the Air Quality Index (AQI) for Clark County at AIRNow's website.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.25 million citizens and 45.5 million visitors a year (including Mesquite, Laughlin and Primm). Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 1 million residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

3/1/2018 - Air Quality Issues Dust Advisory for Friday

??Air Quality Issues Dust Advisory for Friday

AirQuality-Final_AdvDust.jpgClark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued a dust advisory for Friday, March 2, to advise residents and local construction sites of the possibility of elevated levels of blowing dust due to the forecast of high winds in our area.

Airborne dust is a form of inhalable air pollution called particulate matter, or PM, which aggravates respiratory diseases. Under windy conditions people with heart or lung disease, older adults and children may feel better staying indoors as much as possible because they could be at greater risk from particulates, especially when they are physically active, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.

County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at http://redrock.clarkcountynv.gov/forecast/. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org. The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people understand when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people. Tips to limit exposure to dust include:

  • Limit outdoor exertion on windy days with dust is in the air. Exercise, for example, makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Run your air conditioner inside your house and car to filter out particulates.
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • To keep dust down, drive slowly on unpaved roads.
  • Don't take short cuts across vacant lots.
  • Ride off-road vehicles in approved areas outside the urban Las Vegas Valley.
  • Call Air Quality's dust-complaint hotline at (702) 385-DUST (3878) to report excessive amounts of blowing dust from construction sites, vacant lots or facilities. 
    ###

    Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.2 million citizens and 46.2 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 951,000 residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.
2/22/2018 - Air Quality Issues Dust Advisory for Thursday

Clark County's Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has issued a dust advisory for Thursday, Feb. 22, to advise residents and local construction sites of the possibility of elevated levels of blowing dust due to the forecast of high winds in our area.Airborne dust is a form of inhalable air pollution called particulate matter, or PM, which aggravates respiratory diseases. Under windy conditions people with heart or lung disease, older adults and children may feel better staying indoors as much as possible because they could be at greater risk from particulates, especially when they are physically active, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Consult your physician if you have a medical condition that makes you sensitive to air pollution.County Air Quality officials will continue to monitor conditions and will post updates on the forecast page of the DAQ website at http://redrock.clarkcountynv.gov/forecast/. You can subscribe to free air quality forecasts and advisories via e-mail or text through the EnviroFlash service at www.enviroflash.org. The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people understand when they may experience health effects from air pollution. An AQI of 101 or more is considered a level that may be unhealthy for sensitive groups of people. Tips to limit exposure to dust include:

  • Limit outdoor exertion on windy days with dust is in the air. Exercise, for example, makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Run your air conditioner inside your house and car to filter out particulates.
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • To keep dust down, drive slowly on unpaved roads.
  • Don't take short cuts across vacant lots.
  • Ride off-road vehicles in approved areas outside the urban Las Vegas Valley.
  • Call Air Quality's dust-complaint hotline at (702) 385-DUST (3878) to report excessive amounts of blowing dust from construction sites, vacant lots or facilities.
    ###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.2 million citizens and 46.2 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 951,000 residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

2/22/2018 - Proposal to Adopt Ordinance Amending Sections 13 and 14

Clark County is proposing to adopt an ordinance amending Sections 13 and 14 of the Clark County Air Quality Regulations (AQR) to address changes in federal requirements for stationary sources of air pollution.

More Information

Section 13 entitled "National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants" (NESHAP) addresses requirements for those stationary sources that emit hazardous pollutants listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts 61 and 63. Section 14 entitled "New Source Performance Standards" (NSPS) addresses requirements for those stationary sources listed in 40 CFR Part 60. The proposed ordinance amending AQR Sections 13 and 14 will incorporate updates to the federal regulations as of July 1, 2017.

A public comment period on the proposed ordinance amending Sections 13 and 14 will begin on February 20, 2018 and end at 4:00 PM on March 21, 2018. The public and regulated community may review and provide written comments and input on the proposed ordinance amending AQR Sections 13 and 14 during this period. The Board will consider the proposed ordinance, along with all written and any oral public comments, at a public hearing at 10:00 AM April 17, 2018, in the Commission Chambers, Clark County Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Parkway, Las Vegas, in accordance with AQR Subsection 2.2.2. 

Copies of the proposed ordinance may be reviewed at the Department of Air Quality, 4701 W. Russell Road, second floor, Las Vegas, Nevada 89118. The draft ordinance is also available for review on the Clark County Department of Air Quality website at 29TUhttp://www.clarkcountynv.gov/airquality/regulations/Pages/Rules_ProposedRevisions.aspxU29T. Copies may also be obtained by contacting Richard Beckstead at (702) 455-1611 or beckstead@clarkcountynv.gov.

Any written comments must be submitted no later than 4:00 PM on March 21, 2018, delivered and addressed as follows:  (1) by mail or delivery to the Clark County Department of Air Quality, Attention: Rule Improvement Project, 4701 W. Russell Rd., Las Vegas, NV 89118; (2) by e-mail addressed to beckstead@clarkcountynv.gov; OR by fax to (702) 383-9994.

2/12/2018 - Winds Kick Up Dust, but Looks are Deceiving

??Winds Kick Up Dust, but Looks are Deceiving

Looking a little dusty out there? Yes, but Clark County Dept. of Air Quality meteorologist Paul Fransioli reminds people that looks may be deceiving today. Conditions are improving today as winds are gradually diminishing.

"Regional storms brought with them windy conditions that kicked up a lot of dust in Southern Nevada this weekend, and some if it is lingering into today" said Air Quality's Senior Air Quality Meteorologist Paul Fransioli. "We've been monitoring conditions and have not exceeded Standards for either PM10 or PM2.5."

"PM" stands for particulate matter which is one of the criteria pollutants monitored and regulated by the Dept. of Air Quality. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, PM is a mixture of solid particles and liquid droplets found in the air. It may be dust, dirt, soot or smoke. PM particles may be visible as haze or blowing dust.

PM10 are inhalable particles with diameters that are 10 micrometers and smaller. PM2.5 are fine inhalable particles with diameters smaller than 2.5 micrometers. How small is PM2.5? By comparison, the average human hair is about 70 micrometers in diameter.

"Monitoring air quality is often challenging because it sometimes looks worse than it is and other times you can't even see the problem," said Fransioli. "That's why we rely on our network of monitoring stations throughout the county and our and visibility cameras to provide us data to make determinations about air quality."

The EPA's Air Quality Index translates air quality data into colors to help people understand when they may experience health effects from air pollution. People who are considered sensitive for respiratory issues, may want to take extra precaution, even during periods of moderate blowing dust. Tips to limit exposure to dust include:

  • Limit outdoor exertion on windy days with dust is in the air. Exercise, for example, makes you breathe heavier and increases the amount of particulates you are likely to inhale.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • Run your air conditioner inside your house and car to filter out particulates.
  • Consider changing your indoor air filters if they are dirty.
  • Call Air Quality's dust-complaint hotline at 702-385-DUST (3878) to report excessive amounts of blowing dust from construction sites, vacant lots or facilities.

For the latest in air quality forecasts and information, go to AirQuality.ClarkCountyNV.gov or follow us on Twitter: @CCAirQuality.

###

Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing top-quality service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the world-famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the nation's 14th-largest county and provides extensive regional services to more than 2.2 million citizens and 46.2 million visitors a year. Included are the nation's 8th-busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the state's largest public hospital, University Medical Center. The County also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to about 951,000 residents in the unincorporated area. Those include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

11-28-2017 - 2018 Annual Air Quality Invoicing Timeline
The timeline for the upcoming 2018 Annual Air Quality Invoicing is provided, via the hyperlink.More Information
11/2/2017 - Revised Dust Control Operating Permit Application Advisory

Air Quality has revised the Dust Control Operating Permit application. Over the past several years, the department has received many comments and suggestions from the public concerning the Dust Control Operating Permit application/process.  We are listening to the suggestions and implementing changes to improve our permitting process.

Some of the changes include:

  • A sign-waiver checkbox option for projects less than two weeks long;
  • Elimination of the requirement to include multiple parcel numbers on applications; and
  • A new requirement to include a project map with every application.


The revised application will take effect on November 3, 2017
Air Quality will be accepting both the old and the revised applications during a two-week transition period ending on November 19, 2017. Effective November 20, 2017, Air Quality will no longer accept the old application.

The revised application, along with instructions and a quick tip sheet, are available at:

http://www.clarkcountynv.gov/airquality/compliance/Pages/Compliance_DustForms.aspx

Please use Internet Explorer when accessing the Clark County website and Adobe Acrobat Reader when accessing the forms.

If you have any questions regarding the revised application, please contact the Dust Permitting staff at (702) 455-5942 or Email: aqdcp@clarkcountynv.gov

9/28/2017 - Permitting Emission Unit Advisory

STATIONARY SOURCE PERMITTING ADVISORY:

Vehicle Loading as Emission Units for Exporting Minerals

This Stationary Source Permitting Advisory is intended for all stationary sources in Clark County, NV, that are required to obtain and/or maintain an air quality permit for processing minerals. This advisory applies to all stationary sources that will submit an application to the Clark County Department of Air Quality (DAQ) for a new, renewed, or modified operation.

DAQ has determined that the activity of loading minerals into vehicles (e.g., trucks, railcars, etc.) after being processed at a stationary source will be treated as an emission unit for the purposes of stationary source permitting. Because DAQ has treated the similar activity of transporting raw materials to a mineral processing plant as an emission unit, the department has concluded that the activity of loading vehicles transporting materials away from a mineral processing plant is a comparable emission unit.

Effective immediately, DAQ will require applicants to list all activities associated with loading vehicles with minerals as emission units. Applicants must include these activities as emission units, along with all relevant information, in the next application submittal to modify mineral processing at a stationary source or to renew a stationary source permit.

If you have any questions regarding this change, or need more information, please contact our Small Business Assistance Program staff at (702) 455-5942.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is a stationary source and when is a permit required?

A stationary source is any building, structure, facility, or installation that emits or may emit any regulated air pollutant. A stationary source that has a potential to emit any regulated air pollutant that is equal to or greater than the emission applicability thresholds listed in the Clark County Air Quality Regulations (AQRs) is required to obtain an air quality permit

What is a stationary source permit application?

A stationary source permit application is used to obtain, renew, or revise an air quality permit. Permits are issued to stationary sources in Clark County, NV. AQR Sections 12.0–12.5 list the requirements for obtaining a stationary source permit.

 As a stationary source that processes minerals, what must I do?

Stationary sources submitting applications to DAQ for obtaining, renewing, or revising an air quality permit must include all vehicle loading activities as emission units. The information submitted for vehicle loading should include, but not be limited to, a description of the activity, the amount of throughput that can be achieved, the amount of throughput that is being proposed, and the amount of air emissions associated with the activity. 

Where can I get a copy of the permit application forms?

DAQ's website contains applications, worksheets, and all other department forms required to obtain a stationary source permit.

5/2/2017 - Aggregate Processing Permitting Workshop

??AGGREGATE PROCESSING METHODOLOGY WORKSHOP

The Clark County Department of Air Quality is holding a workshop to provide information and solicit comments about a revised permitting methodology for aggregate processing operations located in Clark County, NV. The workshop will include the following topics:

  • Permit types: flexible and case-by-case
  • New/revised permitting forms and calculation worksheets
  • Regulatory requirements
  • Program development and implementation process

All interested parties are welcome to attend to receive preliminary information and ask questions. Attendees will have the opportunity to provide comments during and after the workshop for consideration during the development process.

Date: May 31, 2017
Time: 1:00 until 3:00 PM
Location: Clark County Operations Center West Campus
              4701 W. Russell Road
              Las Vegas, NV 89118
              Presentation Room, 1st floor

There is no requirement to register in advance for the workshop, however you can email the number of attendees from your organization to AQPermitting@ClarkCountyNV.gov. If you have questions regarding the workshop or need more information, please call (702) 455-5942.

03-06-2017 - Annual Fee Schedule Update (Effective 3/10/2017)
Clark County Air Quality fees are adjusted annually based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI)
More Information
2/21/2017 - Permitting Forms Advisory

STATIONARY SOURCE PERMITTING ADVISORY:

Minimum Requirements for Submitting Applications

Mandatory Use of Departmental Forms to Accept Stationary Source Permit Applications

This Stationary Source Permitting Advisory is intended for all minor stationary sources in Clark County, NV, that are required to obtain and/or maintain a minor source permit.  This advisory applies to all minor stationary sources that will submit an application to the Clark County Department of Air Quality (DAQ) for a new or modified operation after February 13, 2017.

After that date, DAQ will only accept stationary source permit applications that are submitted using departmental forms that are available on the Air Quality website, as applicable. Where department worksheets and other forms are available, these forms must be completed and included in any stationary source permit application package. DAQ will not accept applications that do not contain all the required departmental forms.    

If you have any questions regarding this change, or need more information, please contact our Small Business Assistance Program staff at (702) 455-5942.

Richard Beckstead, Permitting Manager

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is a Minor Stationary Source?

A minor stationary source is any building, structure, facility, or installation that emits or may emit any regulated air pollutant that has a potential to emit equal to or greater than the emission thresholds listed in Air Quality Regulation (AQR) 12.1.1(c). A minor stationary source is not required to obtain an "Authority to Construct" pursuant to AQR 12.4.3 or a Part 70 Operating Permit.

What is a Stationary Source Permit application?

A Minor Source Permit Application is an application that is used to obtain, renew or revise a Minor Source Permit.  Permits are issued to minor stationary sources in Clark County, NV. The requirements for obtaining a minor stationary source permit are listed in AQR 12.0 and 12.1.

As a Minor Stationary Source, what must I do?

Minor stationary sources submitting applications to DAQ for obtaining, renewing or revising a permit must complete and include all departmental worksheets and other forms, as they apply to their operation. If deficiencies are identified during a screening of the application, the applicant must amend the application and return it to DAQ when all the required departmental forms are included.

Where can I get a copy of the forms?

Applications, worksheets and other departmental forms for stationary source permitting are available on DAQ's website.

12/15/2016 - Permitting Application Advisory

??STATIONARY SOURCE PERMITTING ADVISORY:

Minimum Requirements for Submitting Applications

Implementation of a Checklist for Minimum Content to Accept Stationary Source Permit Applications

This Stationary Source Permitting Advisory is intended for all minor stationary sources in Clark County, NV, that are required to obtain and/or maintain a minor source permit.  This advisory applies to all minor stationary sources that will submit an application to the Clark County Department of Air Quality (DAQ) for a new or modified operation after January 1, 2017.

After that date, DAQ will only accept stationary source permit applications that contain all the items listed in the Stationary Source Permit Application Checklist, as applicable. DAQ will not accept applications that do not contain all the required information and payment of the application fee.    

If you have any questions regarding this change, or need more information, please contact our Small Business Assistance Program staff at (702) 455-5942.

Richard Beckstead, Permitting Manager

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is a Minor Stationary Source?

A minor stationary source is any building, structure, facility, or installation that emits or may emit any regulated air pollutant that has a potential to emit equal to or greater than the emission thresholds listed in Air Quality Regulation (AQR) 12.1.1(c). A minor stationary source is not required to obtain an "Authority to Construct" pursuant to AQR 12.4.3 or a Part 70 Operating Permit.

What is a Stationary Source Permit application?

A Minor Source Permit Application is an application that is used to obtain, renew or revise a Minor Source Permit.  Permits are issued to minor stationary sources in Clark County, NV. The requirements for obtaining a minor stationary source permit are listed in AQR 12.0 and 12.1.

As a Minor Stationary Source, what must I do?

Minor stationary sources submitting applications to DAQ for obtaining, renewing or revising a permit must include all the information on the Stationary Source Permit Application Checklist, as it applies to their operation. If deficiencies are identified during a screening of the application, the applicant must amend the application and return it to DAQ when the criteria of the checklist have been satisfied.

Where can I get a copy of the checklist?

The Stationary Source Application Checklist is listed with the applications and forms for stationary source permitting on DAQ's website.

Can my Stationary Source Permit application be deemed incomplete after it is accepted?

Yes, an application can be deemed incomplete even though it included the information listed in the checklist. The minimal requirements of the checklist ensures the application contains the information necessary to begin a technical analysis. During this analysis, more information may be necessary to fully evaluate the stationary source. An application may be deemed incomplete if more information is required after DAQ initiates a technical analysis.

11/17/2016 - GDO Test Notification Form Web Announcement

??On 11/21/2016, the "Gasoline Dispensing Operation – Test Notification Form" will be updated to a new version. As of this date, the previous version of the form will no longer be accepted. In addition, we will no longer assess fees for submittal of the updated form.

8/30/2016 - Use and Permitting of Emergency Generators

On May 1, 2016, the D.C. Circuit Court vacatur of the Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine (RICE) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), 40 CFR 63, Subpart ZZZZ, and New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), 40 CFR 60, Subparts IIII and JJJJ, provisions allowing emergency engines to operate up to 100 hours per year for emergency demand response (EDR) and voltage/frequency deviations takes effect.  After the vacatur, engine operating for EDR and voltage/frequency deviations must comply with the standards for nonemergency engine (those that Air Quality typically calls continuous duty engines).  EPA has provided a detailed guidance which can be found at:  https://www3.epa.gov/ttn/atw/icengines/docs/RICEVacaturGuidance041516.pdf

EPA also requested and received a voluntary remand of the provision allowing emergency engines to operate for up to 50 hours per year to mitigate local transmission and distribution limitations.

Air quality will be removing these provisions from issued permits as the permit is revised or renewed and will not be including them in future permits.

8/15/2016 - Information on Natural Occurring Asbestos (NOA) in Southern Nevada

Current information by the Southern Nevada Health District: 
     Natural Occuring Asbestos in Southern Nevada

University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers Brenda Buck and Rod Metcalf recently published an article related to Natural Occurring Asbestos in the Boulder City, Southeast Henderson, and the Colorado River Black Canyon areas.  Naturally occurring asbestos occurs in rocks and soils as a result of natural geological processes and is found in many states west of the Rockies.

Currently, UNLV researchers have identified Actinolite asbestos in the rocks and soils however, there is still much that is unknown about the extent of the volcanic parent rock sources and amounts, as well as the potential health effects of these minerals.  Additional research by UNLV is ongoing to learn more about all of these items.

Until further studies are completed the public should not panic but be aware and exercise common sense towards minimizing dust emissions to the air.  To minimize exposure it is important to keep soil disturbance in these areas to a minimum by limiting dust generating activities, to use water or other methods to prevent dust entrainment into the air and to stabilize soil, and avoid exposure to blowing dust.  The public needs to be informed and advised that further study is necessary to fully evaluate the extent of natural asbestos occurrence in the area.  The discovery of natural occurring asbestos is not unique to Southern Nevada.  Many western states identified naturally occurring asbestos in the 90s and worked with federal, state, and local partners to advise the public on methods to prevent asbestos exposures.

Links to the report prepared by researchers Buck and Metcalf, as well as other published information regarding natural occurring asbestos are referenced below:

Naturally Occurring Asbestos: Potential for Human Exposure, Southern Nevada, USA
Asbestos and Health: Frequently Asked Questions
Limiting Environmental Exposure to Asbestos in Areas with Naturally Occurring Asbestos
Naturally Occurring Asbestos: Approaches for Reducing Exposure

3/21/2016 - Air Quality Regulation Sections 52 and 60 Compliance Advisory Notices
Contact: Small Business Assistance
Phone: 702-455-5942
Email: airquality@clarkcountynv.gov


In accordance with EPA rulemaking, the Department of Air Quality is providing a compliance advisory notice for Sections 52 and 60 of the Air Quality Regulations concerning gasoline dispensing facilities, use of cutback asphalt, and general VOC controls.

This Compliance Advisory is intended for any facility dispensing gasoline or aviation gasoline for private or public use in Clark County, Nevada.

Compliance Advisory AQR Section 52 GDFs

This Compliance Advisory is intended for all currently active degreasing operations, surface coating operations for large appliances and general users of solvents or other volatile organic compounds operating with or without a current Air Quality permit in Clark County, Nevada:

Compliance Advisory AQR Section 60 General VOC Controls

This Compliance Advisory is intended for all currently active users of cutback asphalt operating with or without a current air quality permit in Clark County, Nevada, who use paving asphalts liquefied with petroleum distillate:

Compliance Advisory AQR Section 60 Users of Cutback Asphalt

7/27/2012 - Air Quality Website Address Change
Contact: Rick Hasse
Phone: 702-455-2791
Email: rlh@clarkcountynv.gov


On Friday, August 3, 2012 at noon, we will be modifying Air Quality's  website URL path.  Although  content on the site will remain the same, how to reach it will be a bit different. 

Instead of:
"http://.../depts/daqem/..." 

it will become :
"http://.../depts/AirQuality/...". 

Those who have bookmarked links to our site will need to correct or re-create them after we have implemented this change.

3/7/2012 - Departmental Name Change
Contact: Departmental Name Change
Phone: 702-455-1611
Email: rroberts@clarkcountynv.gov

On March 6, 2012, the Board of County Commissioners approved a change in our name from the Department of Air Quality and Environmental Management to the Department of Air Quality. We will be updating forms and other information to reflect the name change in the near future.
9/27/2010 - Pollen
Contact: Phillip Wiker
Phone: 702-455-1603
Email: wiker@clarkcountynv.gov


In November, 2010, as a result of the economic downturn and declining budgets, as well as the retirement of a long-term key aeroallergen monitoring technician, the Board of County Commissioners authorized the termination of the pollen monitoring program as a necessary cost-saving measure.  Although the program will undoubtedly be missed by some of our residents and medical professionals, the pollen monitoring program is not a required or mandated air quality program.  We have learned much about the seasonal aeroallergen patterns that occur in the Las Vegas Valley and surrounding areas in the past 25 years.  The following timeline and seasonal sampling information will be helpful to those desiring general information about the prevalent pollen patterns typically found in the area.  The American Academy of Allergy Asthma Immunology (AAAAI), together with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) are posting this information here:
http://pollen.aaaai.org/nab/index.cfm?p=allergenreport&stationid=223

For further information on Aeroallergen History and Cycles in Clark County, click here:
http://www.clarkcountynv.gov/AirQuality/monitoring/Pages/Monitoring_PollenReports.aspx

For facts about pollen, click here:
http://airquality.clarkcountynv.gov/Pollen/Pollen_facts_clean.pdf